Friday, September 30, 2016

Arizona University gives a shout-out to 'Cli-Fi" with the publication of a cli-fi anthology of prize-winning short stories

Arizona University gives a shout-out to 'Cli-Fi" with the publication of a cli-fi anthology of prize-winning short stories


By Staff Writer (edited by Dan Bloom at ''The Cli-Fi Report'' via www.cli-fi.net)

It was indeed nice and comforting to read the introduction to the anthology by its three editors, and also to the accompanying commentary by Kim Stanley Robinson, also included in the book, titled "Everything Change," a nod to Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood who coined the Everything Change term.

The three editors wrote in their intro:

We hope that this collection will help readers to make sense of climate
change, to grapple with all of the bewildering emotions associated with
climate imagination and climate reality, and to facilitate conversations
about the futures we want and how to create them.
The literary movement of
climate fiction
is often credited with playing
a major part in mobilizing societies to act on climate change.
 
Climate
fiction, sometimes called “cli-fi,” has exploded over the last decade
and enjoys growing popularity.
 
Amazon lists more than 2000 results
for “climate fiction,” and more than 400 for “cli-fi.” Among these
are a growing number of anthologies and academic treatments. And
climate fiction novels are only one part of a larger cultural trend
that is beginning to explore climate change as a social and cultural
phenomenon, not just a scientific and policy issue. '

Kim Stanley Robinson also pronounced on ''cli-fi'' -- aand pproved of it -- and says it's here for the long haul, in his commentary in the new ASU antho:


KSR wrote:

  ''As part of that fidelity to the real, a lot of near-future science fiction is also becoming what some people now call **climate fiction**.
[Aka cli-fi.]  This is because climate change is already happening, and has become an unavoidable dominating element in the coming century. The new name thus reflects the basic realism of near-future science fiction, and is just the latest in the names people have given it; in the 1980s it was often called cyberpunk, because so many near-future stories incorporated the coming dominance of globalization and the emerging neoliberal dystopia. Now it’s climate change that is clearly coming, even more certainly than globalization. That these two biophysical dominants constitute a kind of cause and effect is perhaps another story that near-future science fiction can tell. In any case, climate fiction will be one name for this subgenre for a long time to come. This is a good thing, because fiction is how we organize our knowledge into plots that suggest how to behave in the real world. We decide what to do based on the stories we tell ourselves, so we very much need to be telling stories about our responses to climate change and the associated massive problems bearing down on us and our descendants. This book collects a number of new and exciting stories about things that will be happening soon, as people try to adapt to a changing climate and its impacts on our biosphere. It’s fair to ask whether that means that these stories are depressing and unpleasant to read; the answer is no, they aren’t, and in fact they are tremendously stimulating. This should not come as a surprise. Literature is about reality, indeed is part of the creation of reality, so it always deals with hard situations. This engagement is a crucial part of literature’s interest to us."

 
 
So it's official. ''Cli-fi'' is here to stay.
 
As Robinson said:
 

 

  ''As part of that fidelity to the real, a lot of near-future science fiction is also becoming what some people now call 'climate fiction'.
This is because climate change is already happening, and has become an unavoidable dominating element in the coming century. The new name thus reflects the basic realism of near-future science fiction, and is just the latest in the names people have given it; in the 1980s it was often called cyberpunk, because so many near-future stories incorporated the coming dominance of globalization and the emerging neoliberal dystopia. Now it’s climate change that is clearly coming, even more certainly than globalization. That these two biophysical dominants constitute a kind of cause and effect is perhaps another story that near-future science fiction can tell. In any case, climate fiction will be one name for this subgenre for a long time to come. This is a good thing, because fiction is how we organize our knowledge into plots that suggest how to behave in the real world.
 

 LINK TO PDF

http://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2016/09/everything-change-anthology-of-cli-fi.html

Thursday, September 29, 2016

ASU intro to new Cli-Fi short story anthology gives shout-out to cli-fi meme...

ASU intro to new Cli-Fi short story anthology gives shout-out to cli-fi meme...

''We hope that this collection will help readers to make sense of climate
change, to grapple with all of the bewildering emotions associated with
climate imagination and climate reality, and to facilitate conversations
about the futures we want and how to create them.
The literary movement of
climate fiction
is often credited with playing
a major part in mobilizing societies to act on climate change.
 
Climate
fiction, sometimes called “cli-fi,” has exploded over the last decade
and enjoys growing popularity.
 
Amazon lists more than 2000 results
for “climate fiction,” and more than 400 for “cli-fi.” Among these
are a growing number of anthologies and academic treatments. And
climate fiction novels are only one part of a larger cultural trend
that is beginning to explore climate change as a social and cultural
phenomenon, not just a scientific and policy issue. '

Kim Stanley Robinson pronounces on ''cli-fi'' -- approves of it -- and says it's here for the long haul, in his intro to the new ASU antho:

Kim Stanley Robinson pronounces on ''cli-fi'' -- approves of it -- and says it's here for the long haul, in his intro to the new ASU antho:


  ''As part of that fidelity to the real, a lot of near-future science fiction is also becoming what some people now call **climate fiction**. [Aka cli-fi.]  This is because climate change is already happening, and has become an unavoidable dominating element in the coming century. The new name thus reflects the basic realism of near-future science fiction, and is just the latest in the names people have given it; in the 1980s it was often called cyberpunk, because so many near-future stories incorporated the coming dominance of globalization and the emerging neoliberal dystopia. Now it’s climate change that is clearly coming, even more certainly than globalization. That these two biophysical dominants constitute a kind of cause and effect is perhaps another story that near-future science fiction can tell. In any case, climate fiction will be one name for this subgenre for a long time to come. This is a good thing, because fiction is how we organize our knowledge into plots that suggest how to behave in the real world. We decide what to do based on the stories we tell ourselves, so we very much need to be telling stories about our responses to climate change and the associated massive problems bearing down on us and our descendants. This book collects a number of new and exciting stories about things that will be happening soon, as people try to adapt to a changing climate and its impacts on our biosphere. It’s fair to ask whether that means that these stories are depressing and unpleasant to read; the answer is no, they aren’t, and in fact they are tremendously stimulating. This should not come as a surprise. Literature is about reality, indeed is part of the creation of reality, so it always deals with hard situations. This engagement is a crucial part of literature’s interest to us."

When Margaret Atwood tweets, the world listens! The story of ''Ruby the Climate Kid'' in Australia!


 
 
 
by 0
Six year old Ruby, The Climate Kid
Six year old Ruby's passion for saving the planet finds a big fan in famous Canadian novelist, Margaret Atwood. Dan Bloom reports.

WHEN MARGARET Atwood tweets, the world listens.

And when the 76-year-old Canadian novelist chanced upon a short video of a 6-year-old girl in Australia named Ruby, talking about how she admired environmental activists like David Suzuki, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Sir David Attenborough in a YouTube video she made with her mum Natalie, Atwood turned to one of her popular social media platforms – Twitter – and tweeted the link to her 1.3 million Twitter followers.
Neil deGrasse Tyson has also seen the video now, and social media is spreading the word tweet by tweet and update by update.
Meet ''Ruby, the Climate Kid,'' as she calls herself in the video. With several videos already uploaded to YouTube about protecting the planet and other ecological issues, Ruby plans to continue making short videos in the future, and slowly build a fan base. These things take time, but with a Tweet from Margaret Atwood making waves across the seas – Atwood ''facebooked'' the Ruby video link, too, according source – there's a big future for this young girl with a mind for science.
"Ruby, the Climate Kid" is a six year old Gamilaraay girl, fiercely passionate about saving the planet and alerting everyone to how dire the situation is, even if they have grown complacent, Independent Australia wrote the other day, in an article penned by her mother Natalie Cromb who serves as the Indigenous Affairs editor for the newspaper. According to David Donovan, IA's editor, the online website bills itself as "the journal of democracy and independent thought."
Ruby's mum says that from a very young age, her daughter has been influenced by people like Attenborough, Tyson and Suzuki. And now she has a new friend in Dr. Atwood.
Natalie told this reporter:
"She is an avid reader of environmental newsletters and non-fiction books about wildlife. She was appalled to find out that five animals have been declared extinct since she was born and has been determined to make a difference ever since."
In between school – Ruby is currently in Grade 1 – saving the planet with YouTube videos and making her parents laugh, she enjoys spending time with her dad and mum, family and friends at their home on Tharawal country.
When Natalie told Ruby the news that a famous Canadian novelist named Margaret Atwood, who was once 6-year-old herself and did science projects with her brother and sister in those long ago days before YouTube existed, Ruby told her mum:
"But she's so smart, how does she know about me?"

This is my entry into the 2016 Young Scientist Model and Innovation category. Published on Aug 25, 2016.

Explaining that Dr Atwood had seen the video online and enjoyed watching it and listening to Ruby's words and Tweeted it to her one million followers, Ruby told her mum:
"I hope she likes it and thinks that I have good ideas to save our planet."
Natalie explained to a reporter why Ruby makes videos as ''the Climate Kid'' and writes about the planet, noting:
From a very young age, Ruby has shown a demonstrable interest in the world around her and she has observed and learnt a great deal.
She watches Sir David Attenborough, David Suzuki and Neil deGrasse Tyson documentaries which inspire her and educate her greatly. She has a great affinity for planet life which I think is because of her culture and she genuinely believes she can help save this planet.
Ruby is now planning to make a short video to speak directly to Margaret Atwood in Canada. An early peak at the transript looks something like this:
Dear Margaret Atwood,
I am so happy you saw my video about saving our sick planet. And you Tweeted the link to your one million followers and facebooked the link, too. 
You are so kind. I guess you were six years old once, so you understand me, just a little six year old girl in Australia. I can't believe you watched my video on Youtube!
I know you care about the oceans, too. You are concerned about our warming oceans and ocean acidification.
I support you, Margaret Atwood. You are my new hero. Thank you. You are 76 and I am six. There is no difference! We are kindred spirits. 
I love you, Margaret Atwood.
Ruby the Climate Kid shares her thoughts on YouTube and Facebook. 
See Ruby's story on IA here. You can follow the Climate Kid on Twitter @theclimatekid and Dan Bloom @do_you_cli_fi_.

Ruby appeals to Yates to be kind to bees in their products
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License

''And it is questionable whether we need our top literary talents contributing to this genre, as Amitav Ghosh argues in The Great Derangement, or if lesser writers can help us picture what the future holds for our world if manmade climate change continues unchecked.''

DARRELL DELAMAIDE writes:

"And it is questionable whether we need our top literary talents contributing to this genre, as Amitav Ghosh argues in The Great Derangement, or if lesser writers can help us picture what the future holds for our world if manmade climate change continues unchecked."


The World of “Cli-Fi”

Writers use fiction to make climate change real.
 

“Welcome to the end of the world, already in progress.”
This dystopian manifesto is the way John Joseph Adams introduces a new anthology of climate fiction, or “cli-fi,” an emerging literary genre that is trying to bring the reality of climate change home in a way people can understand.
“It’s hard to imagine how a two-degree increase in the average global temperature could possibly affect you or me, or why a three-foot rise in sea level would matter to someone who doesn’t live on a coastline,” Adams writes in the introduction to Loosed Upon the World: A Climate Fiction Anthology, which he edited.
“Fiction is a powerful tool for helping us contextualize the world around us,” Adams says. “By approaching the topic in the realm of fiction, we can perhaps humanize and illuminate the issue in ways that aren’t as easy to do with only science and cold equations.”
The short stories collected in this anthology portray near futures that are unremittingly grim, often brutal, and pretty final. Adams isn’t kidding about the end of the world.
The authors represented, such as Paolo Bacigalupi and Margaret Atwood, have also written novels depicting climate catastrophes at greater length and in horrifying detail.
Bacigalupi’s most recent novel, The Water Knife, expands on a story in the anthology portraying a Phoenix deprived of water at war with a Las Vegas that is hogging the flow of the Colorado River in a world where interstate travel has been banned and Texans are the ultimate refugees because that state has no water at all.
It is a world closer to Mad Max than our present day, but whereas earlier dystopias depicted worlds devastated by nuclear war or viral pandemics, this new genre focuses on climate change as the primary cause of destroying life as we know it.
Bacigalupi’s debut novel, Hugo Award winner The Windup Girl, relies on both plague and climate to create a dystopia. Other notable catastrophe novels, such as Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, portray worlds depleted by other types of extinction events but also suffering the effects of climate change. A more recent book gaining much attention, The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, by Lionel Shriver, shows the effects of climate change but focuses on the collapse of the financial system.

There is little point in trying to delimit what constitutes cli-fi, or debating whether it is a sub-genre of science fiction or a class of its own. And it is questionable whether we need our top literary talents contributing to this genre, as Amitav Ghosh argues in The Great Derangement, or if lesser writers can help us picture what the future holds for our world if manmade climate change continues unchecked.

Some novels that are less ambitious or diluvial can also be harrowing. We Are Unprepared by Meg Little Reilly depicts a rural Vermont awaiting a perfect storm that will bring flooding and freezing never before experienced even in this New England environment.
As with any good dystopian novel, the drama here comes from how people react to the catastrophe, and in this case, the preparation for the storm and its arrival test the marriage of the protagonist and a way of life cherished for generations.
Likewise, The Sunlight Pilgrims by Jenni Fagan is mostly about the anticipation of a looming catastrophe as the calming of the Gulf Stream promises to bring plummeting temperatures, monumental snow, and calving icebergs to the western coast of Scotland.
These novels may not be as brutal as The Water Knife, where a ruthless water enforcer is the hero/antihero, and show more intimate, tender moments that we can all relate to. But don’t be fooled — the outcome is equally grim.

Everything Change: An Anthology of ''Cli-Fi'' short stories from the 2016 ASU cli-fi short story contest judged by Kim Stanley Robinson

 
 
Everything Change: An Anthology of Cli-Fi

Everything Change features 12 stories from the ASU 2016 Cli-Fi Short Story Contest along with along with a foreword by contest judge Kim Stanley Robinson and an interview with climate fiction author Paolo Bacigalupi.

Everything Change is free to download, read, and share:
 
The PDF version of Everything Change was meticulously and lovingly designed and formatted by Matt Phan and Nina Miller. If it is convenient for you to read the book in PDF format, we strongly recommend it.

The anthology will also be available shortly in EPUB format through the Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo digital book stores.

The title Everything Change is drawn from a quote by Margaret Atwood, our first Imagination and Climate Futures lecturer in 2014.

Table of Contents:
  • Kim Stanley Robinson, Foreword
  • Professors/Editors Ms. Manjana Milkoreit, Ms Meredith Martinez, and Mr Joey Eschrich, [Editors’ Introduction]
  • Adam Flynn and Andrew Dana Hudson, “Sunshine State” [WINNERS!] [$1K prize!]
  • Kelly Cowley, “Shrinking Sinking Land”
  • Matthew S. Henry, “Victor and the Fish”
  • Ashley Bevilacqua Anglin, “Acqua Alta”
  • Daniel Thron, “The Grandchild Paradox”
  • Kathryn Blume, “Wonder of the World”
  • Stirling Davenport, “Masks”
  • Diana Rose Harper, “Thirteenth Year”
  • Henrietta Hartl, “LOSD and Fount”
  • Shauna O’Meara, “On Darwin Tides”
  • Lindsay Redifer, “Standing Still”
  • Yakos Spiliotopoulos, “Into the Storm”
  • Professor Ed Finn, “Praying for Rain: An Interview with Paolo Bacigalupi”

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

6-year-old Australia girl captures 76-year old Margaret Atwood's heart

 
6-year-old Australia girl captures
76-year old Margaret Atwood's heart

 
special to the Independent Australia
 
VIDEO LINK


    Margaret E. Atwood
@MargaretAtwood
The Kid: Young Scientist Entry 2016 https://youtu.be/giUDu4f1bUo  via @YouTube




When Margaret Atwood tweets, the world listens.

And when the 76-year-old Canadian novelist chanced upon a short video of a 6-year-old girl in Australia named Ruby, talking about how she admired environmental activists
like David Suzuki, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Sir David Attenborough in a YouTube video she made with her mum Natalie, Atwood turned to one of her popular social media platforms -- Twitter -- and tweeted the link to her 1.3 million Twitter followers. Neil deGrasse Tyson has also seen the video now, and social media is spreading the word tweet by tweet and update by update.

Meet ''Ruby, the Climate Kid,'' as she calls herself in the video. With several videos already uploaded to Youtube about protecting the planet and other ecological issues, Ruby plans to continue making short videos in the future, and slowly build a fan base. These things take time, but with a Tweet from Margaret Atwood making waves across the seas -- Atwood ''facebooked'' the Ruby video link, too, according sources -- there's a big future for this young girl with a mind for science.

"Ruby, the Climate Kid" is a six year old Gamilaraay girl, fiercely passionate about saving the planet and alerting everyone to how dire the situation is, even if they have grown complacent, the Independent Australia newspaper wrote the other day, in an article penned by her mother Natalie Cromb, who serves as the Indigenous Affairs editor for the newspaper. According to David Donovan, the newspaper's editor, the online website bills itself as "the journal of democracy and independent thought."


Ruby's mum says that from a very young age, her daughter has been influenced by people like Attenborough, Tyson and Suzuki. And now she has a new friend in Dr. Atwood.


"She is an avid reader of environmental newsletters and non-fiction books about wildlife," Natalie told this reporter. "She was appalled to find out that five animals have been declared extinct since she was born and has been determined to make a difference ever since."
In between school -- Ruby is currently in Grade 1 --  saving the planet with YouTube videos and making her parents laugh, she enjoys spending time with her dad and mum, family and friends at their home on Tharawal country.

​When Natalie told Ruby the news that a famous Canadian novelist named Margaret Atwood, who was once 6-year -ld herself and did science projects with her brother and sister in those long ago days before YouTube existed, Ruby told her mum: "But she's so smart, how does she know about me?"



Explaining that Dr Atwood had seen the video online and enjoyed watching it and listening to Ruby's words and tweeted it to her one million followers, Ruby told her mum: "I hope she likes it and thinks that I have good ideas to save our planet."
​Natalie explained to a reporter why Ruby makes videos as ''the Climate Kid'' and writes about the planet, noting: "From a very young age, Ruby has shown a demonstrable interest in the world around her and she has observed and learnt a great deal." She watches Sir David Attenborough, David Suzuki and Neil deGrasse Tyson documentaries which inspire her and educate her greatly. She has a great affinity​ for planet life which I think is because of her culture and she genuinely believes she can help save this planet."

Ruby is now planning to make a short video to speak directly to Margaret Atwood in Canada. An early peak at the transript looks something like this:

"Dear Margaret Atwood,
I am so happy you saw my video about saving our sick planet.  And you tweeted the link to your one million followers and facebooked the link, too.  You are so kind.  I guess you were six years old once,  so you understand me,  just a little six year old girl in Australia.  I can't believe you watched my video on Youtube! I know you care about the oceans,  too.  You are concerned about our warming oceans and ocean acidification. I support you, Margaret Atwood.  You are my new hero.  Thank you.  You are 76 and I am six.  There is no difference! We are kindred spirits.  I love you,  Margaret Atwood."

Ruby the Climate Kid shares her thoughts on YouTube and Facebook. You can follow the Climate Kid on Twitter @theclimatekid.
 
PHOTO
 
  • Ruby the Climate Kid is a six year old Gamilaraay girl, fiercely passionate about saving the planet and alerting everyone to how dire the situation is, even if they have grown complacent.
  •  
  •    RUBY is 6 years old from Australia. Her oped on stopping climate change VIDEO is PRICELESS -
  • https://youtu.be/giUDu4f1bUo

      •  

      •  


      •  

        Tuesday, September 27, 2016

        Meera Kumar on how did the ''GREAT AWAKENING'' came about: an annotated review of Amitav Ghosh latest essay collection

        Meera Kumar on how did the ''GREAT AWAKENING'' came about: an annotated review of Amitav Ghosh latest essay collection
        Original link is here:


         

        The Great Awakening: a personal take on Amitav Ghosh's new climate change essay collection from the University of Chicago Press

         



         


         
        Lecture 1, ABOVE VIDEO
        and Lecture 2 here  
         
        The Great Awakening: a personal take on Amitav Ghosh's brilliant ''new'' climate change essay based on his four 2015 U.C. college lectures from the University of Chicago Press

        Here's my take.

        First of all: the book will likely reach two main audiences: United Nations IPCC COP 22 climate policy wonks, and assorted climate scientists in state-funded think tanks and universities around the world......AND.......literary critics of all stripes and ideologies in India, the UK, the USA and Australia

        Now for my take, with book in hand:

        1. It's a great, brilliant, essential and important book about climate change and the ''GREAT AWAKENING'' taking place now among activists around the world, among them Bill McKibben and Leonardo DiCaprio, in terms of creating novels and movies that tackle, head on, climate change issues in sci-fi, cli-fi and spec-fic novels and movies.

        2. It's a slight book, even in the hardback edition, about the size in terms of height and width to most paperback books, and the three main chapters are for the most part a rehash of the four Berlin Family Lectures that Ghosh was invited to give at the University of Chicago in October 2015 and rewritten and amplified with over 200 footnotes -- called END NOTES in the bool -- and while it's a slight book, it's also heavy, as in "Yeah, man, what he is saying is heavy, very heavy!"

        3. The chapters on politics and history are pitch perfect.

        4. The chapter on how Western novelists and movie producers have been tackling climate issues was poorly researched and dropped the ball all the way along. In fact, Ghosh should have called the book THE GREAT AWAKENING, because in fact, that is what has been doing on in Western literature, vis a vis climate change and man made global warming since the 1960s. He hardly mentions this. Oops. In the lectures, he also hardly mentioned it. Double oops.

        5. Throughout the entire book, the word EARTH, which stands for the name of our dear home planet called Earth, with a capital E, has been lowercased by the editors, probably in keeping with the style guide of the University of Chicago Press. Alan?  In a book like this, about protecting the Earth, it is a serious mistake to lowercase the word as "earth" throughout the entire book. Wrong, wrong, wrong. I wonder what Dr Ghosh will have to say about this when he finds out?

        6. One of the best parts of the book are the 216 END NOTES at the end of the book that are kind of like footnotes but not really footnotes. More like eye-notes. Very good and one of the best parts of the book and worth reading. I read the END NOTES over and over three times! Fascinating stuff there.

        7. The Great Awakening is a wake up call for humanity and a wake up call for novelists and screenwriters in the West and in India and worldwide -- Africa and South America and all of Asia, including communist China and free democratic Taiwan, and ''cute'' Japan, too -- to continue waking up and using their skills and talents and voices as artists and writers and poets and film directors and climate activists to keep doing that they are doing: tackling these isuses with their art. So they book is not really about any grea derangement. It's about THE GREAT AWAKENING. Think about that as you are reading it.

        [8[. [One irony of irony things that has nothing to to do with Dr Ghosh, since I am sure he had no idea and no knowledge of this, but for a hardhitting leftwing tract that takes strong issue with Western imperialism and colonialism, and pretty much pisses on the entire Anglosphere, whatever that is -- read the book to find out -- the Berlin Family lectures at the University of Chicago which sponsored the four lectures that comprise the book's essense and which stipulated that a book HAD to be published after the lecutres BY the University of Chicago Press -- a brilliant PR and marketing move and a good thing, too, because now we have this book in our hands and BRAVO to Dr Ghosh for having written it, despite its few flaws -- but the irony of ironies is that the the USA philanthropy in Chicago that funded the lectures and the book gives SOME of its money to an imperialist and colonial state in the Middle East, and for a book that attacks imperialsim and colonialism ...to be funded by a philanthropy that does just the opposite, supports imperialism and colonialsm in the Middle East -- and I am sure Dr Ghosh knew nothing about this, although the information has always been on the University of Chicago website for anyone to see -- well, look at this: ''Melvin Berlin and his wife, Randy, a retired lawyer and currently a lecturer in law at the University of Chicago Law School, also support 20 post-combat Israel Defense Forces (IDF) soldiers.'']

        [Not that it matters, and it's really not interesting at all, and not part of the book's message at all. But we live in an impure world, don't we? Globalization and imperialism and capitalism and all that! Oy!]

        ]LINK]:
        http://support.ats.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=17283.0


          • Amitav Ghosh, "Politics," Lecture 4 of 4, 10.07.15
            youtube.com
          • Amitav Ghosh,
          • Amitav Ghosh, "
            youtube.com
          • "History," Lecture 3 of 4, 10.06.15

          • youtube.com

           

         

        1. The 2015 Berlin Family Lectures with Amitav Ghosh "The Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming" Lecture one: "Fiction I" September 29, 2015 In the first lecture of the 2015 Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Family Lecture Series, renowned author Amitav Ghosh explores the impact of ...
        2.  
        3. The 2015 Berlin Family Lectures with Amitav Ghosh "The Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming" Lecture one: "Fiction II" September 30, 2015 In the second lecture of the 2015 Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Family Lecture Series, renowned author Amitav Ghosh continues his exploration ...
          www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvilBabbog


        aka "The Great Awakening" -

        Monday, September 26, 2016

        Whatever happened to volunteer ''editor'' LynnS79? And does the Kinja ID of mlynn have any connection to Lynn's name? or is it mere coincidence, as Sherlock Holmes would say?

         
        QUESTION: A quick question: remember the editing war brouhaha a few years ago when someone from Canada using the ID of ..... LynnS79 ....tried to get the title of a page changed to fit her agenda? For four months she battled. All is well now, water under the bridge, life goes on, and the page is better for it now. I love what eventually happened.

        Actually, this email gives some possible clues to who LynnS79 really was:

        '' thanks for the news you send. Funny, I just posted about Karel ńĆapek
        last week (see my link here'':)
        http://mlynn.kinja.com/climate-change-in-literature-and-the-arts-1644566007).

        [[[[Hmmm, that LINK that she was using then (that link has been deleted now and changed to a new name but still written by the same person...) and is it possible that she was using that kinja platform for some of her posts and using the user id of "mlynn" and is mlynn perhaps a reference to  mlynn for shortening? Could be. But no way, she would never register at Wiki under a WikI ID and then insist and pretend that it was not her. She is more professional and ethical than that



        CLUE # 1

        A person writing with the Kinja ID name of ''mlynn'' wrote this "Climate Change in Literature and the Arts" at
        http://mlynn.kinja.com/climate-change-in-literature-and-the-arts-1644566007 and it now leasd to another, different page of a person using a different but very interesting user ID. Any connection? Possibly.

        Could this be the very elusive LynnS79 at Wikipedia who deleted her entire ID for LynnS79 in December 2016 after first posting at Wiki Talk on May 8, 2014 using the LynnS79 ID even then? OOPS! For six months from November 2014 to April 2015 she posted over 100 edits on the Wiki pages and went online almost every day to attack the page itself. What kind of professor has the time to do all that attacking, and then to suddenly disappear and never post on Wiki again, except perhaps under a different USEr ID at wiki, since Wiki allows editors to use as many different user IDs as they wish, and none of them can be TRACED, as per Wiki rules. Even the mods do not know who LynnS79 is and even if they did, they cannot every say. But in fact, they do not even know and do not want to know, as it is against WIKI rules to go into an editors registration archives and look up their REAL NAME and REAL email address. But the evidence now points to a certain someone.

        But we will not out her. She must out herself. That is the RULE at Wiki, and unlike LynnS79 we follow the rules.

        Saturday, September 24, 2016

        Richard Chen presented this academic paper on ''Cli-Fi'' at a cultural conference in Taiwan in 2014- [FULL TEXT]

        NTU Professor Richard Chen presented this academic paper on ''Cli-Fi'' in English at a conference in Taiwan in 2014 -

         http://northwardho.blogspot.tw/2016/09/professor-richard-chen-presented.html -

        [FULL TEXT] #CliFi

        Friday, September 23, 2016

        In “Anthrocene,” Cave seems to draw an ironic parallel between the evolutionary effect of man to his environment, while singing about what it means to be eternally human — love, loss, longing.

        The fifth track from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' 2016 album Skeleton Tree. The title, “Anthrocene”, is a variant of the proposed scientific term Anthropocene (from Greek anthro- or anthropo- meaning “man” and -cene meaning “new” or “era”).

        “Anthropocene” refers to the modern geological era, when human activities such as burning fossil fuels began to have a significant impact on the Earth.

        While the concept “anthropocene” began as an academic model, its use has broadened to literature, art and even popular culture.

        It’s use by Cave on “Skeleton Tree” somehow seems analogous to the song “Higgs Boson Blues” from his previous album, “Push the Sky Away, where an arcane, but newsworthy idea is treated as a metaphorical device to draw out the composer’s profound emotions.

        In "Higgs Boson Blues,” particle physics is used to highlight culture’s strange ability to compress space and time into a dense, meaningless void.

        In “Anthrocene,” Cave seems to draw an ironic parallel between the evolutionary effect of man to his environment, while singing about what it means to be eternally human — love, loss, longing.

        lyrics

        [Verse 1]
        All the fine winds gone
        And this sweet world is so much older
        Animals pull the night around their shoulders
        Flowers fall to their naked knees
        Here I come now, here I come
        I hear you been out there looking for something to love
        The dark force that shifts at the edge of the tree
        It's alright, it's alright
        When you turn so long and lovely, it's hard to believe
        That we're falling now in the name of the Anthrocene

        [Verse 2]
        All the things we love, we love, we love, we lose
        It's our bodies that fall when they try to rise
        And I hear you been looking out for something to love
        Sit down beside me and I'll name it for you
        Behold, behold
        The heaven bound sea
        The wind cast its shadow and moves for the tree
        Behold the animals and the birds and the sky entire
        I hear you been out there looking for something to set on fire
        The head bow children fall to their knees
        Humbled in the age of the Anthrocene
        [Verse 3]
        Here they come now, here they come
        Are pulling you away
        There are powers at play more forceful than we
        Come over here and sit down and say a short prayer
        A prayer to the air, the air that we breathe
        And the astonishing rise of the Anthrocene

        [Outro]
        Come on now, come on now
        Hold your breath while you're safe
        It's a long way back and I'm begging you please
        To come home now, come home now
        Well, I heard you been out looking for something to love
        Close your eyes, little world
        And brace yourself

        Amitav Ghosh is criticized for his book on WRITING THE UNIMAGINABLE (see reader comment below)

        Amitav Ghosh is criticized for his book on WRITING THE UNIMAGINABLE (see reader comment below)


        Broadlands






        Starting a discussion...

        Mr. Ghosh, among others, has misunderstood the situation in Bangladesh with respect to climate change. A 2014 peer-reviewed article in "Climate Risk Management" by Hugh Brammer addresses this. "Bangladesh’s dynamic coastal regions and sea-level rise".
        His introduction is to the point..."There is a widespread misconception that a rising sea-level with global warming will overwhelm Bangladesh’s coastal area contour by contour and will thereby displace as many as 10–30 million people in the 21st century e.g., (Gore, 2009; Houghton, 2009). In some accounts, that situation will be aggravated by high rates of land subsidence (Syvitski et al., 2009), a recent doubling of the rate of sea-level rise (Smith, 2012) and rapid, on-going rates of coastal erosion (Vidal, 2013a,b). The accounts given to-date imply that the Bangladeshi people are helpless against a rising sea-level and will be unable to resist the rising water. Those assumptions and descriptions are incorrect. Bangladesh’s coastal area is not uniform, nor is it static. It is dynamic, and so are the people of Bangladesh."
        Mr. Ghosh describes Hurricane Sandy as improbable and unprecedented. This is another misunderstanding. A hurricane called "The Long Island Express" devastated the same region in 1938. Wikipedia has described it...
        "Hurricane Sandy not the first to hit New York: A 1938 storm 'The Long Island Express' pounded the Eastern Seaboard. The storm formed near the coast of Africa in September of the 1938 hurricane season, becoming a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale before making landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on Long Island on September 21. Long Island was struck first, before New England, Vermont, New Hampshire and Quebec, earning the storm the nickname the ‘Long Island Express’. The winds reached up to 150 mph and had waves surging to around 25–35 feet high.[The destruction was immense and took a while to rebuild. The western side of the hurricane caused sustained tropical storm-force winds, high waves, and storm surge along much of the New Jersey coast. In Atlantic City the surge destroyed much of the boardwalk. Additionally, the surge inundated several coastal communities; Wildwood was under 3 feet (0.91 m) of water at the height of the storm. The maximum recorded wind gust was 70 m.p.h. at Sandy Hook.
        In 1938 (one of the warmest years on record in the US) this extreme weather event might have been improbable and unprecedented, but not today.
        A point to be made? Will authors years from now ask if the unimaginable was our lack of appreciation for historical climatology, our rush to a "settled science" and a misguided attempt to mitigate the climate quickly with improbable technology? Have we learned nothing from our experiences in the 1960s and 70s?

        and 2.

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