Tuesday, October 17, 2017

6 cli-fi reading suggestions

Sitting at my desk in front of my window, I have the view of the eerie orange hue that has tinted my outer surroundings, and, evidently, many other places in the UK, as there have been warnings night and day of the commencing hurricane Ophelia. The BBC has reported that this “red sun” has been caused by the hurricane. This red sun has caused an atmosphere that would be complementary to a halloween film or an apocalypse.

Though, this is not the first the world has seen of hurricanes this year. There has been large amounts of damage due to these hurricanes. For example, Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico. Hurricane Harvey is another example of the cause of ruin and floods. Hurricane Irma also hit Florida and the Virgin Islands. According to the New York Times, just 14 days after Irma hit the Virgin Islands, “the second storm drowned what the first couldn’t destroy.” One must not forget the earthquake in Mexico — Guardian reported that at least 225 died during the earthquake.
Those mentioned are just the beginning of the list of the disasters of 2017. The US News produced a listicle on other disasters including the monsoon in Sri Lanka and the snowfall in Afghanistan that caused the death of mostly women and children.
These disasters were only heightened by the warming of the earth, according to Climate Signals. There has been a rise in sea level and a warmer atmosphere that has warmed sea surfaces as reported by Climate Signals — and these warm sea surfaces speed up hurricanes. The warmer air holds a greater amount of moisture that evokes this greater risk of flooding and rainfall.
As a result of disasters, the literary world has birthed a new genre: Cli-Fi (Climate Fiction). Cli-Fi explores the hardships that may come from climate change. In this new genre, there is a sense of realism and features of dystopia. There have been shortages of books in this genre in contrast to the focus of writers on the political/socio/economic climate, but this genre has been on the rise for a short amount of time and may heighten readers awareness of the frightening potential future. Dan Bloom (journalist and teacher) insisted that Cli-Fi may be the “wake up call” that people need.
Here is a “wake up call” list of blurbs selected from goodreads:

ONE: TC BOYLE, year 2000 A FRIEND OF THE EARTH

1. “MaddAddam” (Trilogy) by Margaret Atwood 
A man-made plague has swept the earth, but a small group survives, along with the green-eyed Crakers – a gentle species bio-engineered to replace humans…

(Source: goodreads)
2. “The Windup Girl” by Paolo Bacigalupi 
Anderson Lake is a company man, AgriGen’s Calorie Man in Thailand… he encounters Emiko… the Windup Girl… Emiko is not human; instead, she is an engineered being, creche-grown and programmed to satisfy the decadent whims of a Kyoto businessman, but now abandoned to the streets of Bangkok. Regarded as soulless beings by some, devils by others, New People are slaves, soldiers, and toys of the rich in a chilling near future in which calorie companies rule the world, the oil age has passed, and the side effects of bio-engineered plagues run rampant across the globe. 
(Source: goodreads)
3. “The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future” by Naomi Oreskes and Eric M. Conway 
“The year is 2393, and a senior scholar of the Second People’s Republic of China presents a gripping and deeply disturbing account of how the children of the Enlightenment, the political and economic elites of the so-called advanced industrial societies, entered into a Penumbral period in the early decades of the twenty-first century, a time when sound science and rational discourse about global change were prohibited and clear warnings of climate catastrophe were ignored. What ensues when soaring temperatures, rising sea levels, drought, and mass migrations disrupt the global governmental and economic regimes? The Great Collapse of 2093.
This work… reasserts the importance of scientists and the work they do and reveals the self-serving interests of the so called “carbon industrial complex” that have turned the practice of sound science into political fodder.”
(Source: goodreads)
4. “Do Not Resuscitate” by Nicholas Ponticello 
“Do Not Resuscitate is the firsthand account of Jim Frost, an aging misanthropist who witnessed the rise and fall of the United States as a world power, the digitalization of the planet, the advent of the water wars, and the near collapse of the global economy…”
(Source: goodreads)
5. “The Carbon Diaries 2015” by Saci Lloyd 
“It’s January 1st, 2015, and the UK is the first nation to introduce carbon dioxide rationing in a drastic bid to combat climate change. As her family spirals out of control, Laura Brown chronicles the first year of rationing with scathing abandon.”
(Source: goodreads)

Files

I recently had the enviable task of reading nearly every story Richard Matheson ever wrote and selecting 33 tales to be included in Penguin Classics’ The Best of Richard Matheson. This turned out to be like stepping into a time machine, transported back to the age when I started reading him. I was fourteen. The year was 1986. My introduction to his fiction, his short novel I Am Legend, was one of the first books that made me run up to my friends and tackle them so they’d all check it out, too. If you haven’t read it (what the hell is wrong with you?), it manages to be a work of science fiction, a vampire story, a progenitor of the “biological plague” apocalyptic novel, and also an excellent thriller. All that in about 160 pages. I had to find out more. I dove into The Shrinking Man (the film added “Incredible”) and Hell House and wow. I wish I had a more sophisticated way to describe my reaction to the seismic effect of Richard Matheson on my young mind, but “wow” gets at the raw, awestruck nature of thing. And then I came to find out the man had written short stories. I tracked them down with gusto, with glee. And with time I began to relate to the man’s writing in a way that seemed damn near mystical.
I want to explain exactly what I mean by that. There’s a lot I need to say about Matheson, and the importance of his fiction, the reasons why this collection is so vital and worthwhile, but I can’t get to that directly. I will go there eventually. But first I have to tell you about my Matheson moment. I don’t mean that I met the man. I mean I stepped into a story he could’ve written. I have to tell you about Cedric and his mother.

2

My mother made good when I turned fourteen. At least that’s how she saw it when she moved us out of an apartment in one part of Queens and took us to a house she’d bought in another. The woman emigrated from Uganda in her twenties and now, in her forties, she’d worked like a machine to stop renting and start owning. From a two-bedroom to a two-story home, damn right my mother felt proud. Me, my sister, and my grandmother were the grateful tagalongs.
We moved in over the summer and when September rolled around I started going to school. The local public school was Springfield Gardens High, and just before I arrived the place had been outfitted with the newest, latest technology: metal detectors. And with good reason. This was 1986, the Crack Era, and as old news reports will tell you some people had a propensity to shoot guns wildly in places where teens gathered. My mother took one look at the school where she was meant to send her child and she made changes posthaste. This woman was not about to have her kid ushered through those contraptions every morning before heading to homeroom. More to the point, she didn’t want to get some phone call about how I’d been caught by Stray Bullet Syndrome while standing around outside. She found a private school out on Long Island and before I could say “where the hell is Nassau County” she’d gotten me enrolled on a scholarship. My mom was no joke.
My mom also wasn’t a car owner. She got to work and back by taking a bus to the Long Island Rail Road and the train into Manhattan. Suffice to say there weren’t any such choices at Woodmere Academy. People either got dropped off by their parents (Mercedes, BMW, Audi) or they took a school bus. Mom enrolled me in the pickup service and every morning, around 7:45, I’d go out and stand on the corner of 229th Street and 145th Avenue and there I’d wait for one of those long yellow buses to pick me up.
I waited in front of a single-family home with yellow aluminum siding. One morning, maybe around November or December, when the chill weather set in heavy, the front window of that house slipped up and a kid my age stuck his head out the window and called to me.
“Aye,” he called. “Cheese bus.”
I turned, baffled. He had an enormous round head and close haircut. This gave him a kind of Charlie Brown look. A brown Charlie Brown. He wore a white tank top. He was, by no definition, a skinny kid. In fact, me and him might’ve been body doubles.
“Cheese Bus,” he said again, and I realized he’d given me a nickname. Before I could speak he reached one meaty hand out of the window and waved me away.
“Go stand down the block,” he said. “Your bus is fucking up my vibe.”
“You don’t own the sidewalk,” I said. Citing basic property law was the best I could do.
“You sound like a herb,” he said. “Cheese, are you a herb?”
“Well how come you’re not getting ready for school?” I said. What kind of kid treats cutting school like an insult? This one. And with that I cemented my herb status.
“I would try to help you,” he said. “But I can’t even guess where I’d start.”
I walked up to the chain link fencing at the edge of his parents’ property and leaned my elbows on it so that I was posed just like him.
“Seriously though,” I said. “You’re skipping?”
He thought about this a little bit. He sighed and said, “I’ve got company coming over.”
“Like, you’re having a party?”
“Party for two,” he said, then he looked to his left and pointed, discreetly, with one finger.
When I looked up I saw two things: my bus — the cheese bus — chugging toward me; and a girl, fourteen, moving down the block with much more grace. This would turn out to be Lianne, Cedric’s sweetheart since seventh grade. They kissed sweetly when she reached him. He led her inside without even saying good-bye.
After that me and Cedric talked each morning. He’d lean out the window and gab with me before the bus showed up. I made nice, but not because I found him so charming. I’ll admit I had ulterior motives. New in the neighborhood and being bused to a school miles away. How was I going to meet anyone? I wanted to girlfriend, too. Couldn’t Lianne call in a friend for me?
“Nightmare at 20,000 Feet,” The Twilight Zone (1963)

3

It turned out to be surprisingly easy to cut school. Just don’t be on the corner when the bus shows up. After two minutes the driver simply drove on. Meanwhile I’d been tucked inside Cedric’s house, peeking out through the blinds like some secret agent at risk of having his cover blown. The bus left, then Cedric tapped me on the shoulder and said, “Stop hiding.”
Easy to do when two young women knocked at the front door. Cedric went to let them in and I stood there in the living room feeling quite sure I’d ascended to some higher plane of existence. Or was about to. He opened the door and kissed Lianne, then stepped aside so she and her friend Tasha could slip in. The front door fed right into the living room where I stood. The living room fed right into the kitchen. Apparently there were two bedrooms elsewhere — Cedric’s and his mom’s. When I’d asked him if I could use hers — in case things went well with Tasha — he patted me on the arm and said, “Don’t get ahead of yourself.”
Now let me cut in with a message from me as a grown man, as a father. It is absolutely insane that four fourteen-year-olds were sneaking off to get intimate in the middle of the day; I can’t pretend it wasn’t. But at the time it felt wonderfully sane.
Anyway, I’m standing there and Tasha and Lianne are coming through the doorway and then I heard it, a sound in the kitchen. Knocking. Not all that loud, but I was close to the kitchen and getting closer. By that I mean that Tasha and Lianne were taking off their coats and I ran away. Later I told Cedric I went to “get them water,” but there’s no other way to say it: I fled.
As soon as I entered the kitchen the knocking stopped. I figured it might be their boiler kicking in. It was winter after all. I knew I’d run away though so I came up with the water idea and went scrounging for cups. This led me on a chase through the cupboards as, in the other room, Cedric called for me. And then I reached their pantry door. This style of one-family home had a separate little pantry, about the size of a small walk-in closet. I found the door there and, still hunting for glasses, I tried the handle and found it locked. Then Cedric walked into the kitchen.
“Cheese,” he said. “You making me look bad.”
When he said it he didn’t sound playful. He’d convinced his girlfriend to bring someone with her and then his boy had gone and run into the kitchen. But I also wondered if that was really the reason he seemed unhappy with me. He peeked at the pantry door then back to me.
“Cups is over here,” he said, taking four down from a cupboard by the sink. Then he rushed me out of the kitchen.
He put on a movie. I definitely don’t remember what it was. He closed the blinds so the living room went dim. Lianne leaned into him. Tasha and I hardly spoke. She was as nervous as me.
At some point Cedric went to the bathroom and left us alone in the living room. Lianne patted the cushion beside her and Tasha hopped over, the pair whispering and I sat there alone. Hadn’t even sipped my water once. And then I heard it — that knocking — coming from the kitchen again. I didn’t hesitate. Maybe I felt stupid sitting alone. I walked in there and went quiet.
The knocking, low and insistent, came from the other side of that pantry door. I checked for Cedric but he wasn’t around. I tried the door but found it locked. Meanwhile the knocking kept on, regular if weak. It damn sure wasn’t the boiler.
I whispered, “Who is it?”
When I spoke the knocking stopped. I mean instantly. What followed next was a scratching sound. Claws on the floor. I even thought I heard something panting softly.
A dog.
Cedric had a dog and he locked it up when company came over.
The knocking, low and insistent, came from the other side of that pantry door. I checked for Cedric but he wasn’t around. I tried the door but found it locked.
I got to my feet and laughed at myself and now thought only of how I would not fuck things up with Tasha, who — it turned out — was exactly as geeky as me. All I had to do was finally speak to her and find out. We finished the movie together in the living room, all four of us. By the time it was over even me and Tasha were kissing. At some point she mentioned a smell in the room. I almost laughed because I knew it was just the funk of four teenagers fucking around. But she persisted. It was worse than that. Could there be something going rotten in the fridge? In the walls? Maybe there was a mutt somewhere in the house, an animal that had had an accident.
Cedric hardly pulled away from Lianne’s lips. He answered her casually, thoughtlessly. He said, “My mother would never let me have a dog.”
I remember hearing those words and going utterly numb.

4

Which brings us to Richard Matheson.
Just because you may have heard of him, read him, watched the countless shows and movies that he wrote or inspired, that doesn’t mean you may have thought so much about his meaning in the history of the genres of science fiction and fantasy, horror and thrillers. Why bother hashing over all that when you could just dive into the tales themselves? A fine point. I wouldn’t blame you. Actually, I’d encourage such a thing.
I find it interesting to note that Matheson was the son of two Norwegian immigrants. I like to think on that because he is, to my mind, such an American writer, and it’s always good to be reminded that for almost all of us that means, at some point, our people came from elsewhere and landed here. There’s so much journeying in Matheson’s writing — across time and space, across the threshold between life and death, across town to get to work on time (though of course you’ll never get there safely) — as I read through all the stories I wondered how much the journeys of his parents meant to Matheson, the young man. It might be that as the son of a more recent immigrant my mother’s course — her bravery, her drive — informs so much of what I imagine, what I write.
If nothing else he’s written about how his parents came from Norway and found each other, then circled the wagons around family, fearful of the outside world and clinging to each other. Inside the walls sat a young, bookish Richard Matheson. They kept him close but his mind roamed.
Richard Matheson
We should get The Twilight Zone out of the way now. Yes, Richard Matheson wrote some of the most beloved and enduring episodes of that classic show. Let’s rattle off just a few: “Third from the Sun,” “Death Ship,” “Nightmare at 20,0000 Feet.” You’ve seen them and loved them. You’ve sat down with some friend during a Twilight Zone marathon and giddily anticipated when one of them would play. But before they were on your screen they were in magazines, collected in books. I know this seems almost silly to say, but they were all stories first. And what’s so remarkable, when you read them, is to see how perfect they were right from the start. The clarity of the language, the promise of a pleasing mystery, the mounting tension of the confrontation — the revelation — to come, and the cool satisfaction of seeing Matheson pull off this magic again and again and again (and again). Matheson regularly did the patient work of illustrating an ordinary existence only to have it smash directly into the monstrous, and this becomes the moment of a person’s greatest test. Sometimes they triumph, sometimes they fail but Matheson knew that in a way the pushing is the point. The stress and anxiety, the drama and fear, that’s when humanity truly gets to understand itself, understand the world.
Matheson began his writing career with short stories. He worked that form for twenty years, and all were published between 1950 and 1970, a Golden Age for Matheson’s fiction and also for the world of science fiction and fantasy magazines. He started with short stories and an industry existed to support him. Such an idea can seem like fantasy these days. But the pairing was auspicious. These genres were reaching a wider readership, so they’d better have some good content. And Richard Matheson was there. In many ways he was inventing the template that generations of writers would copy.
Matheson regularly did the patient work of illustrating an ordinary existence only to have it smash directly into the monstrous, and this becomes the moment of a person’s greatest test.
The problem with being a pioneer is that you often die out before your settlement thrives. You’re in the ground for years before the village becomes a town; decades before the town becomes a city. Matheson, thankfully, got to see countless kinds of success. It’s always nice to be able to say a writer enjoyed the fruits of his labor. How rare is that? Let’s celebrate it.
But the other issue with being a pioneer is that the generations who come later may forget the ground you tilled, the innovations you brought into being. You hear Matheson’s name on the lips of so many greats, from Stephen King to Joe Hill. (A little family joke I just couldn’t resist.) But he deserves to be spoken of by so many more. His stories became the bedrock of many genres: thriller, horror, science fiction, fantasy, so essential it’s almost impossible to really grasp how much he accomplished. How many people take a moment to give thanks for the sidewalks and highways? Yet most of us couldn’t get anywhere without them.
“Third from the Sun,” The Twilight Zone (1960)
The other reason this may be the case is that Matheson had such an effortless, clear writing style. He threw the reader into the story and made very little attempt to force attention on himself as Author. This is great for stories, but not so good for getting credit. Writing is like life: too often we praise the show-offs, the ones who wink at us when they toss out some abstruse word. Many tend to think of this as artistry, but I’m less inclined. Or maybe I only mean to highlight the grace, and confidence, of a writer like Richard Matheson. Clarity can be artistry as well. It implies confidence, too. You won’t notice much of what he’s doing the first time you tear through these stories, but on your second pass you should take your time.
His central concern is survival. What threatens your existence? Even more important, what will you do to get through? Think of the man in “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” who risks popping open the emergency window of an airplane at cruising altitude so he can fire a gun at the being he’s seen tearing at the plane’s engine. He’s nearly sucked out into the night sky, but he must do something. He, and the other passengers, must survive. The ordinary meets the monstrous and every life is at risk.
But let’s not only talk of the classic stories, the ones you no doubt know; they’re worth the price of admission alone, but Matheson has so much more to offer. There’s my personal favorite find, a story called “Witch War.” Matheson plays out the idea of a conquering army powered only by the occult abilities of a handful of teenage girls. In between decimating the opposing army they talk smack about one another, they mock and joke, by the end they even revel in the fear they cause to the men they’re meant to defend. It’s a subtle and stunning little tale and it shows off another aspect of Matheson’s talent: he can be wickedly funny.
Then there’s “Dance of the Dead.” I don’t want to spoil anything for you, but it’s straight up disturbing. It’s a kind of postapocalyptic undead tale that also predates, even anticipates, the reprobates of A Clockwork Orange. (It was also made into a deeply troubling and memorable episode in the Masters of Horror anthology series, written by Matheson’s son, Richard Christian Matheson, and directed by Tobe Hooper.) Where Richard Matheson often had his stories come out on the side of safety or triumph, this one has no time for such treacle. This one wants to hurt you. And it, too, is a product of the same singularly gifted mind.
The depth and variety of the man’s imagination seem nearly unparalleled. His influence exists even for those who have never read him. He’s in the DNA of too many other writers to count. When you enjoy science fiction and fantasy today, when you read modern horror, you are still reading Richard Matheson.

5

The next morning I decided not to skip school. This also had to do with the fact that Tasha — with whom I was now smitten — told me she couldn’t cut twice in one week. So I showed up at my bus stop right around 7:45, and sure enough the cheese bus turned the corner a few blocks west, right on time. But then Cedric’s living room window opened and he leaned out looking as blasé as always. Yet again he had on my Champion sweatshirt, one of many articles of clothing I’d lent him, never to be returned. He leaned on his elbows and watched me quietly for about the count of three.
“All right then,” he said, keeping direct eye contact. “You want to see?”
Did I? In that moment I didn’t really know.
Cedric opened the front door. I walked into the house with my head down, my curiosity tinged with dread.
The living room looked like it hadn’t been cleaned — or even occupied — since me and Tasha had been there yesterday. The couch cushions still in disarray. Cedric walked ahead of me. He entered the kitchen and I hesitated.
“Well?” he called out.
I moved toward the kitchen, but I can’t say it was my choice. I felt compelled to take a step. Pulled in, drawn closer. As moved I heard the pantry door’s lock click and a faint groan as it swung open. At the same time I smelled it again, what Tasha had been talking about the day before. A kind of rot so strong I experienced it as a wave of heat that made my eyes flutter. And still I stepped through the threshold and entered the kitchen.
“This is my mom,” Cedric said.
There’s a look to ships that have sunk to the bottom of the ocean and remained there for decades. When they’re brought to the surface they’re scaly with barnacles and orange with rust. They look vulnerable and indestructible, simultaneously. A sunken ship, now risen, Cedric’s mother seemed much the same.
As I said, it was the Crack Era and I recognized what had torpedoed this woman. I tried to greet her but there wasn’t time. Cedric’s mother came at me, her hands dug into my coat pockets, she yanked my book bag off from where it dangled on one shoulder and, right in front of me, she unzipped it and tossed everything out on the floor.
“Ma!” Cedric shouted, but he didn’t try to stop her. He’d never looked so young.
Each of us must’ve outweighed Cedric’s mother by two hundred pounds but I knew I didn’t have the strength to challenge her. She tossed through my things and sucked her teeth and both us boys just watched her.
“Ma,” Cedric said again, but much softer this time. “Please, Ma.”
Then she turned and leapt at him, her own child, and sent him flying backward. He went to the ground. She climbed right up onto his chest, that’s how I remember it. She pulled at the sweatshirt, my sweatshirt, and I heard the fabric tear. I went down on a knee and tossed everything back into the bag and that’s when Cedric cried out, I swear I thought it was an infant wailing from another room. When I looked up she’d torn open his sweatshirt and her hands dug at his flesh. I saw blood. I thought she might devour him right there.
And there I’d finally reached my Matheson moment. The ordinary was over. The monstrous was here. I wish I could say I helped him, but I didn’t. I picked up my bag and I scurried backward. If someone was going to survive, better it be me. Even today I can still hear him whispering, pleading, that same single word. “Ma. Ma.”
And there I’d finally reached my Matheson moment. The ordinary was over. The monstrous was here.
I got to the living room and crawled to the front door. I opened it and pulled the door shut behind me. I stopped skipping school after that. I told Tasha about what happened and, bless her, she believed me. But when I went back to the house, knocking for what seemed like hours, Cedric didn’t answer. I’d never seen a place look so lifeless. Lianne told Tasha she couldn’t reach him. She’d call the house, but the phone only rang and rang. I never saw him pop his head out his front window ever again.
Obviously I’ve turned this history into a story, my homage to Richard Matheson, to my old friend Cedric, and even to his mom. While some of this tale is indeed fiction, there really was a monster living in that house.
Which brings me back, one last time, to Richard Matheson. What did this son of Norwegian immigrants who spent the majority of his life writing in California know about the Crack Era nightmares of a black boy from Queens? On the surface I’d say nothing. Superficially he and I could hardly seem farther apart. But then why, when I wrote out what happened between me and Cedric and his mother, did I hear the echoes of so many of Matheson’s tales? I’m not talking about the plot points but the essence. The fight for survival, the monstrous breaking in on the ordinary, no one holds the sole rights to such real estate. But Richard Matheson tilled the soil long before me and, likely, long before you, too. He even built a house in which so many of us still dwell. All hail the architect!

Friday, October 13, 2017

Two songs figure prominently in Bill McKibben's new cli-fi comic caper novel RADIO FREE VERMONT: [lyrics are here]


Two songs figure prominently in Bill McKibben's new comic cli-fi caper novel titled RADIO FREE VERMONT.


One of them is AH, MARY and here are the lyrics and the YouTube link where Grace Potter performs on the Jay Leno Show in 2007


She's skilled at the art of deception and she knows it
She's got dirty money that she plays with all the time
Yeah, she waters the garden and maybe she just likes the hoses
She puts herself just a notch above human kind
Ah, Mary
She'll bake you cookies then she'll burn your town
Ah, Mary
Ashes, ashes but she won't fall down
She's the beat of my heart
She's the shot of a gun
She'll be the end of me
And maybe everyone
Yeah, she's the beat of my heart
She's the shot of a gun
She'll be the end of me
And maybe everyone
Call her a bully, she'll blow up your whole damn playground
Pour her a drink and watch it go straight to her head
She'll take you so high up and cover her eyes as you fall down
Then in the morning, don't be surprised if you're dead
Ah, Mary
She'll

YOUTUBE LINK, words and music by Grace Potter



=========================================


The other song in the novel is ''O-o-H CHILD'' by Stan Vincent in 1970

YOUTUBE link

"O-o-h Child" was a 1970 single recorded by Chicago soul family group the Five Stairsteps and released on the Buddah label. Previously, the Five Stairsteps had had peripheral success recording in Chicago with Curtis Mayfield: when Mayfield's workload precluded his continuing to work with the group they were reassigned to Stan Vincent, an in-house producer for Buddah Records, who had recently scored a Top Ten hit with the Lou Christie single "I'm Gonna Make You Mine". Vincent wrote the song for his son, Chuck. The Five Stairsteps' debut collaboration with Vincent was originally formatted with the group's rendition of "Dear Prudence" as the A-side with Vincent's original composition "O-o-h Child" as B-side. However, "O-o-h Child" broke out in the key markets of Philadelphia and Detroit to rise as high as #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1970. the track's R&B chart impact was more muted with a #14 peak, although "O-o-h Child" is now regarded as a "soft soul" classic. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 21 song of 1970. The Five Stairsteps' only pop Top 40 hit, "O-o-h Child" would be the group's last R&B top 40 hit (they had several top 40 R&B hits in the 1960s) until 1976's "From Us to You". Included on the band's The Stairsteps album from 1970, it has become the Stairsteps' signature song and has inspired more than twenty covers since its release. The song featured various members, including lone female member and eldest sister Alohe, brothers Keni, Dennis, James, and lead singer Clarence Burke, Jr. singing in various parts of the song.





The lyrics tell the listener that "things are gonna get easier" in times of strife. The song's uplifting message helped the song to become popular among pop and rhythm and blues audiences when it was released.

LYRICS HERE

A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide!




by Dan Bloom


As the cli-fi literary genre gathers steam worldwide, it turns out that the major force behind its meteoric rise -- both championing cli-fi and studying it -- is academia. This is my love letter to academics worldwide, who have taken up the challenge of researching, studying and writing about cli-fi. 

Cli-Fi is where it is today largely due to the interest of hundreds academics in English-speaking nations, including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK. Among them, just to name a few here, there's Edward Rubin at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, there's Arindam Basu in New Zealand, there's Stephanie LeMenager at the University of Oregon, there's Jennifer Wicke in Virginia, there's Adeline Johns-Putra in the UK, there's Andrew Milner at Monash University in Australia, there's PhD candidate Cat Sparks in Canberra, there's Daniel Aldana Cohen in Pennsylvania, there's Axel Goodbody in Britain, there's Amitav Ghosh in Brooklyn, there's Gerry Canavan in the Midwest, there's Catriona Sandilands in Canada, there's Serpil Oppermann in Turkey, there's Elizabeth Trobaugh at Holyoke Community College (and a fellow Tufts alum), there's Terry Alan Harpold in Florida, there's Heather Sullivan at Trinity College in Texas, there's Greta Gaard at the University of Wisconsin, there's Amy Brady with a PhD from the University of Massachusetts, there's Ted Howell who earned his doctorate from Temple University, there's Dan Kahan with a deep interest in communicating climate issues, and there's Manjana Milkoreit who is teaching and writing now at Purdue University. And dozens more, more than 100, more than 500 actually. Don't forget T. Ravichandran in India, Scott Slovic in Idaho and Una Chaudhuri at New York University. And in France, Christian Chelebourg! And more: Adam Trexler on Portland, Stephen Rust in Oregon, Rob Nixon, Tim Morton in Texas at Rice University, Robin Murray, Max Boykoff, Timothy Clark, Tom Cohen, Ed Finn at ASU, Ursula E Heise, Selmin Kara, E. Ann Kaplan, Thomas D. Love, Kristi McKim, Mary Woodbury in Canada, and Antonia Mehnert in Germany...

Academics all. Part of a worldwide movement among academics studying and promoting the literary genre of cli-fi since 2010, some even earlier.

Cli-fi has become popular not because of the main newspaper and website media -- not the mainstream media like the New York Times or the Washington Post or the Boston Globe -- nor because of solitary freelance book reviewers, or literary critics or literature and science bloggers. No, the main force behind cli-fi's rise has been the global army of literary academics who have been writing papers, penning opeds and publishing books about cli-fi. It's in the air, and they are writing about it loud and clear.

So this is my love letter to academics worldwide, who often labor in obscurity and without major newspaper headlines announcing their work to the world, but who aside from their teaching duties in classrooms and workshops, take the time to delve into a new literary genre that has much to say about our literary response to global warming and climate change.

Academics are interested in cli-fi and for a very good reason. The rise of cli-fi fits into the reason why they worked hard to obtain their PhDs  and become academics in the first place. They are not beholden to the mass media or to literary gatekeepers. Academics are pioneers, seekers, philosophers, critics. They see the world through their own personal lenses, and cli-fi fits right into their very reason to be alive and living in the 21 Century. Academics are the vanguard, while most literary gatekeepers represent the rear-guard, afraid to venture out of the comfortable cubicles and challenge the status quo. I mean, why rock the boat.

But academics have a different mindset and they are not afraid to rock the boat. It's always been that way. Academics fear nothing.

So long live academics! They are championing cli-fi in a way the MSM has never done, except for a few odd articles here and there. Academics go where their interests take them, without fear or favor. Academics are trailblazers, not gatekeepers, and they are not interested in keeping the "new" out of sight and off our radar screens. Academics write nonfiction, but what they write is powerful and important, full of brilliant insights and analysis in this Age of the Anthrocene.

Academics of the world, I love you!

When I showed a preview of this oped to a friend of mine in academia who has been at the forefront of the cli-fi movement among his peers, he told me in an email: "Nice piece! Very well put. And it's great to see praise for academics."
 

This academic paper by Susanne Leikam and Julia Leyda in Europe shows exactly how welcoming the academic world has been to the rise of cli-fi and how welcoming it will remain in the future as well.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Over 100 academics worldwide have led the way in championing the rise of the cli-fi literary genre --- OPED

Over 100 academics worldwide have led the way in championing the rise of the cli-fi literary genre



 https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/academics-have-led-way-in-championing.html



#CliFi


AND


A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide!


https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/a-love-letter-to-cli-fi-academics.html




#CliFi #academia #genre #tenure #academics

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Spunky Knowsalot Knows A Lot About Bill McKibben's new comic cli-fi novel RADIO FREE VERMONT but so far he's not telling...

Is this Spunky Knowsalot?

---------------------------------------------

American climate activist Bill McKibben has entered the cli-fi world, with a debut novel titled “Radio Free Vermont.” And we have Spunky Knowsalot to thank for this 250-page seriocomic piece of writing. Who? Keep reading to find out who Spunky Knowsalot is!


Way back in 2005, McKibben was calling for novels and movies about cli-fi, and he revisited the same essay in an updated form again in 2009, also calling for cli-fi novels as he did in 2005, but it took him another 12 years to finally sit down with the help of Spunky Knowsalot to write his own comic entry in the cli-fi sweepstakes.


When he wrote the Grist essay titled ”What the warming world needs now is art, sweet art” in 2005, the cli-fi term had not yet been coined. But fast foward to 2017 and McKibben is aboard the train now, using a semi-comic novel to reach readers worldwide, as the book will be translated into 25 languages over the next several years.

So who is Spunky Knowsalot? He first surfaces on the book's dedication page where Mckibben writes: "For Spunky Knowsalot"

Starting November 7, which is the novel’s official publication date, McKibben will embark on a nationwide book tour to promote the novel, and you can expect literary critics and book reviewers and newspaper reporters to ask him about the identity of Mr Spunky Knowsalot. Who? Keep reading.

McKibben’s debut novel -- and a goood solid piece of cli-fi it is! -- follows a band of Vermont patriots who decide that their state might be better off as its own republic in the Age of Trump.

Witty, biting, and terrifyingly timely, ”Radio Free Vermont” is Bill's fictional response to the burgeoning resistance movement created by the election of Donald J. Trump in 2016. It’s cli-fi with a comic twist, as only Mckibben can twist it.

So before we end this preview, who the heck is SPUNKY KNOWSALOT? So far, Bill is not telling, his editors at Blue Rider Press are not telling, his PR people at Penguin RandonHouse Group USA are not telling, and his marketing team is not saying either.
Hint: if anyone knows the identity of Spunky Knowsalot, please leave a message in the comments section below.

Friday, October 6, 2017

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science?

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science?


SEE BLOG POST HERE


https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html




 Wisely, Villeneuve doesn’t try to do that in taking the story forward, but his smog-infested and snowy Southern California as presented here makes a strong case not for the effects of global warming, but rather global cooling. Spoiler alert: It snows in L.A. in this thing.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html

How the New York Times covers cli-fi genre novels and movies



Recently, Liva Albeck-Ripka the New York Times looked at a few recent examples of “cli-fi” or ''clience fiction'' specifically dealing with climate change and questioned how likely these scenarios might be: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/09/how-new-york-times-covers-cli-fi-in.html

Recently, NYT reporter Melena Ryzik asked some "experts" how doom and gloom cli-fi apoca novels/movies can wake up the masses: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/nyt-asks-can-hollywood-cli-fi-movies.html


see also


How the New York Times Books Editor and the Climate Desk covers the cli-fi genre of novels and movies -- (**Hint: they don't!** ) -- https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/how-new-york-times-books-editor-and.html

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Why the NYT and BBC and MSM in general keep getting it wrong about the power of doom and gloom cli-fi movies and novels. IN FACT, they do galvanize people into action. Ask David Wallace-Wells


HELP!


needed!


 from academics keeping current with the topic of climate risk communications vs the EXPERTS who say that doom and gloom cli-fi movies and doom and gloom cli-fi novels are counter productive and turn readers and viewers OFF and make them feel helpless and blue




, .....and this EXPERT advice is backed up, apparently, by some studies by social scientists and climate scientists with TEENS in the UK and elsewhere that say that doom and gloom novels and movies are BAD for getting people to be more aware of the issues and to even take action. I believe that this is all BULLSHIT, pardon my French, and I am open to any comments otherwise, but I am tired of the NYT and Guardian and BBC and other MSM trotting out the old tired same old same old "alleged study" that proves that doom and gloom novels are the wrong way to go. This study does not exist. There was some study a few years ago that studied TEENAGERS in the UK, not adutls, TEENS, and asking them what they felt about doom and gloom stories, etc.
Well, teens are not the intended audience for adult cli-fi novels and movies. !!! So this study is flawed and BS and all the so-called EXPERTS with PHDs at Yale and Harvard and Princeton are used by the NYT to prove this hypothesis which is wrong and has never been proven.
So....can anyone point me to this so-called expert study that says doom and gloom is not the way to go? Link? There are several so-called studies. they are all BS. I want to find the links in order to tell my contacts in the MSM that they are barking up the wrong tree and that doom and gloom novels and movies are just as good as utopian cli-fi novels. It's all up to the readers and viewers.
In other words, "cultural values, literary values, literary input, not scientific knowledge, actually shape global warming views, more and more,'' as a study by Prof Dan Kahan at Yale from 2012 indicates.
So can you show me that STUDY that proves that doom and gloom turns teens off and makes them blue and depressed rather than pushing them to take action.? I believe deeply that doom and gloom ALSO has the power to push people to take action and to take up and be woke. Utopian novels too. Both.
Recently, the NYT did another cli-fi bashing article quotes severeal so-called experts about who doom and gloom is bad for us. I say NO NO No. doom and gloom is realiity, along with utopian visions, too. Show me the links! THANKS.
NYT reporter Melena Ryzik, just the other day in a cli-fi article writes: ""But getting Hollywood movies about climate change made is not easy. And when they do refer to it — as did the Roland Emmerich 2004 disaster flick “The Day After Tomorrow” — they rarely do much to galvanize the public to action. Even well-intentioned filmmakers with carefully drafted cautionary tales often miss the mark, climate scientists say.''
UH, WHO ARE THESE So-called CLMATE SCIENTISTS and what do THEY know about the arts and literature and novels and movies. VERY LITTLE. The NYT should ask writers and movelists and literary critics to answer this question not govt grand funded PHD guys with their heads in the PHD sands, doing study after study, and never once READING A NOVEL: or seeing a movie. IN FACT, cli-fi movies and novels do wake up people and do galvanize people inmto action, That is how i got into the work! Doom and gloom doesn't scare me. And i love utopian stuff too. But lets stop this MSM nonsense that doom and gloom novels turn people off. They don't. they wake them up.
NYT again here: ''And when climate change is depicted on screen, it’s often in an onslaught of fire and brimstone, an apocalyptic vision that hardly leaves room for a hopeful human response.
That, climate researchers and social scientists say, is exactly the wrong message to give.''
HOW does Melena Ryszik a socity reporter and red carpet gossip reporter know this? She doesn't. But she repeats this stuff over and over again. So I want so links to show her otherwise.
MORE from NYT article: “Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, a professor at the University of Michigan who is the author of “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.”
REPoRTER ADDS: But that is just the kind of high-stakes film that Hollywood loves to produce — like “The Day After Tomorrow,” which depicted New York City as a frozen dystopian landscape. Or “Geostorm,” due Oct. 20, in which the climate goes apocalyptically haywire, thanks to satellites that malfunction.
REPORTER ADDS this BS: Copious research shows that this kind of dystopian framing backfires, driving people further into denial and helplessness; instead of acting, they freeze.
Melena did say....''One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is ....that climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi is growing.''
FINALLY! and Melena concluded her article -- ''So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”
“We have to touch people’s hearts on this,” he said. “It’s critical.”






SEE ANTHONY WATTS frist AND ANDREW FREEDMAN second LINKS HERE:


see text and links here -- ''Finally, recognition that doom and gloom, hell and high water, and all that... really aren't effective, and people are getting "climate fatigue" from all that sort of senseless hype.'' says rightwing climate denialist who is not an academic or a scientist but a mere weatherman. -- https://wattsupwiththat.com/.../doomsday-messages-about.../ QUOTE: *****''Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.

“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.

But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.''



https://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/11/19/doomsday-messages-about-global-warming-can-backfire-new-study-shows/


Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.


Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.


email the expert at
willer@standford.edu





“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.


But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.




ANDREW FREEDMAN LINK:


Do not accept New York Mag's climate change doomsday scenario ("Studies have shown...BS)


http://mashable.com/2017/07/10/new-york-mag-climate-story-inaccurate-doomsday-scenario/#zRZEF2mztPqz


see his refrain, which the NYT copied and parrotted: STUDIES HAVE DOWN, which studies, Andrew, which studies? He doesn't link them or ID, just as NYT didnt name or ID them.


''All of this is scary. However, climate scientists nearly universally say that there is still time to avert the worst consequences of global warming, and that this message needs to be driven home again and again in order to encourage leaders to act. Doom and gloom only leads to fear and paralysis, studies have shown.''







Monday, October 2, 2017

NYT asks: ''Can Hollywood 'Cli-Fi' Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?''

UPDATE "Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html




NYT asks: ''Can Hollywood 'Cli-Fi' Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?''

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/02/movies/mother-darren-aronofsky-climate-change.html





EXCERPT:


see also:
Recently, Liva Albeck-Ripka the New York Times looked at a few recent examples of “cli-fi” or ''clience fiction'' specifically dealing with climate change and questioned how likely these scenarios might be: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/09/how-new-york-times-covers-cli-fi-in.html

Recently, NYT reporter Melena Ryzik asked some "experts" how doom and gloom cli-fi apoca novels/movies can wake up the masse: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/nyt-asks-can-hollywood-cli-fi-movies.html




but first read this:


HELP from academics keeping current with the topic of climate risk communications vs the EXPERTS who say that doom and gloom cli-fi movies and doom and gloom cli-fi novels are counter productive and turn readers and viewers OFF and make them feel helpless and blue, and this EXPERTP advice is backed up, apparently, by some studies by social scientists and climate scientists with TEENS in the UK and elsewhere that say that doom and gloom novels and movies are BAD for getting people to be more aware of the issues and to even take action. I believe that this is all BULLSHIT, pardon my French, and I am open to any comments otherwise, but I am tired of the NYT and Guardian and BBC and other MSM trotting out the old tired same old same old "alleged study" that proves that doom and gloom novels are the wrong way to go. This study does not exist. There was some study a few years ago that studied TEENAGERS in the UK, not aduts, TEENS, and asking them what they felt about doom and gloom stories, etc.
Well, teens are not the intended audience for adult cli-fi novels and movies. !!! So this study is flawed and BS and all the so-called EXPERTS with PHDs at Yale and Harvard and Princeton are used by the NYT to prove this hypothesis which is wrong and has never been proven.
So....can anyone point me to this so-called expert study that says doom and gloom is not the way to go? Link? There are several so-called studies. they are all BS. I want to find the links in order to tell my contacts in the MSM that they are barking up the wrong tree and that doom and gloom novels and movies are just as good as utopian cli-fi novels. It's all up to the readers and viewers.
In other words, "cultural values, literary values, literary input, not scientific knowledge, actually shape global warming views, more and more,'' as a study by Prof Dan Kahan at Yale from 2012 indicates.
So can you show me that STUDY that proves that doom and gloom turns teens off and makes them blue and depressed rather than pushing them to take action.? I believe deeply that doom and gloom ALSO has the power to push people to take action and to take up and be woke. Utopian novels too. Both.
Recently, the NYT did another cli-fi bashing article quotes severeal so-called experts about who doom and gloom is bad for us. I say NO NO No. doom and gloom is realiity, along with utopian visions, too. Show me the links! THANKS.
NYT reporter Melena Ryzik, just the other day in a cli-fi article writes: ""But getting Hollywood movies about climate change made is not easy. And when they do refer to it — as did the Roland Emmerich 2004 disaster flick “The Day After Tomorrow” — they rarely do much to galvanize the public to action. Even well-intentioned filmmakers with carefully drafted cautionary tales often miss the mark, climate scientists say.''
UH, WHO ARE THESE So-called CLMATE SCIENTISTS and what do THEY know about the arts and literature and novels and movies. VERY LITTLE. The NYT should ask writers and movelists and literary critics to answer this question not govt grand funded PHD guys with their heads in the PHD sands, doing study after study, and never once READING A NOVEL: or seeing a movie. IN FACT, cli-fi movies and novels do wake up people and do galvanize people inmto action, That is how i got into the work! Doom and gloom doesn't scare me. And i love utopian stuff too. But lets stop this MSM nonsense that doom and gloom novels turn people off. They don't. they wake them up.
NYT again here: ''And when climate change is depicted on screen, it’s often in an onslaught of fire and brimstone, an apocalyptic vision that hardly leaves room for a hopeful human response.
That, climate researchers and social scientists say, is exactly the wrong message to give.''
HOW does Melena Ryszik a socity reporter and red carpet gossip reporter know this? She doesn't. But she repeats this stuff over and over again. So I want so links to show her otherwise.
MORE from NYT article: “Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, a professor at the University of Michigan who is the author of “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.”
REPROTER ADDS: But that is just the kind of high-stakes film that Hollywood loves to produce — like “The Day After Tomorrow,” which depicted New York City as a frozen dystopian landscape. Or “Geostorm,” due Oct. 20, in which the climate goes apocalyptically haywire, thanks to satellites that malfunction.
REPORTER ADDS this BS: Copious research shows that this kind of dystopian framing backfires, driving people further into denial and helplessness; instead of acting, they freeze.
Melena did say....''One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is ....that climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi is growing.''
FINALLY! and Melena concluded her article -- ''So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”
“We have to touch people’s hearts on this,” he said. “It’s critical.”



One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is children’s programs, Ms. Levin said, which “work beautifully for everyday practices and overall awareness. Parents often watch with them, and they learn together.”
 
And climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi  [see hot link here cli-fi] is growing.
 
 
One thing too few people do, according to Mr. Boykoff, the University of Colorado researcher, is laugh about climate change. Alexander Payne’s forthcoming “Downsizing,” in which people are shrunk to tiny versions of themselves — thereby using less resources — takes a swing at that approach.
 
Mr. Boykoff has had his students perform a comedy show about environmental destruction; a research paper on the outcome is being readied for publication. “If just scientists talking about their research and findings were successful” in motivating the public, “we’d be sorted by now,” Mr. Boykoff said. “But that’s not true. A lot of people don’t engage with these things through scientific ways of knowing. So the arts, the cultural sphere, is a really important part of this that’s underexplored so far.”
 
 
Mr. Maibach, the George Mason professor and an expert in polling on climate understanding, said the greatest problem facing climate communicators is that Americans are not talking about climate change enough — in any shape. “We call it the climate silence,” he said, “and it’s pretty profound.”
 
 
So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”

SEE ANTHONY WATTS frist AND ANDREW FREEDMAN second LINKS HERE:


see text and links here -- ''Finally, recognition that doom and gloom, hell and high water, and all that... really aren't effective, and people are getting "climate fatigue" from all that sort of senseless hype.'' says rightwing climate denialist who is not an academic or a scientist but a mere weatherman. -- https://wattsupwiththat.com/.../doomsday-messages-about.../ QUOTE: *****''Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.

“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.

But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.''



https://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/11/19/doomsday-messages-about-global-warming-can-backfire-new-study-shows/


Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.


Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.


email the expert at
willer@standford.edu





“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.


But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.




ANDREW FREEDMAN LINK:


Do not accept New York Mag's climate change doomsday scenario ("Studies have shown...BS)


http://mashable.com/2017/07/10/new-york-mag-climate-story-inaccurate-doomsday-scenario/#zRZEF2mztPqz


see his refrain, which the NYT copied and parrotted: STUDIES HAVE DOWN, which studies, Andrew, which studies? He doesn't link them or ID, just as NYT didnt name or ID them.


''All of this is scary. However, climate scientists nearly universally say that there is still time to avert the worst consequences of global warming, and that this message needs to be driven home again and again in order to encourage leaders to act. Doom and gloom only leads to fear and paralysis, studies have shown.''





Sunday, October 1, 2017

A new calendar system dates October 2, 2017 instead as October 2, 75,017 -- can you get with the program?




''The Madonna of Global Warming'' (Yann Quero)
=====================
A new calendar system dates
October 2, 2017
instead as
October 2, 75,017


[Can you get with the program? Comments welcome here below in the comments section or by email.]




One of the reasons we humans today cannot wrap our heads around the real deep issues and time frames of global warming and climate change is that our calendar time frame is too limited, with all major religious calendars systems from Mosaic, Jesaic, Mohammadaic, Buddhaic, and all other religions of the past 5000 year origin dates being too limited. As everyone on this site know, it is not really 2017 now. Jesus has nothing to do with where we are now in time, and nor does Moses or Mohammed or the Buddha or anyone else from these supernatural fake religions. In fact, if we could SEE the time frame in a much longer view, maybe we could get a better sense of the dangers we are in. So I created a new calender time framing today: the date today is October 2, Year 75,017 (it's a new timeframe, try it with your friends and colleages) Why 75,000 years time frame. Think about it and ask me if you still don't get it. So. New Years this coming Janunary will be January1, Year 75,018...) 2017 does not make any sense now in the Anthropocene. AGREE? DISAGREE? Add to the conversation! -- Cheers, Dan Bloom on October 2, 75,017.....PS i kept the 017 in the new date so that future historians and archivists can match the dates of 75,017 and 75,018 and so on with the OLD DATES from before this new dating system caught on. Which could take another 2500 years but i am starting today for anyone who would like to join me. Welcome to 75,017....it's a whole new ballgame!