Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Meet Hannah Fairfield, climate editor with a mission



Meet Hannah Fairfield, Alaskan climate editor with a mission

by staff writer, with agencies

As climate change continues to be debated nationwide pro and con by activists and Trumpists, a new global warming maven is in the spotlight.

Meet Hannah Fairfield, the current editor of the New York Times revamped Climate Desk at the newspaper's Manhattan newsroom. She started in her new position this year after a nationwide search for a chief editor of the section and she's on a roll now, backed by a strong team of veteran reporters and with bunch of new hires coming aboard in June, too.




Born and raised in a rural Alaskan village, Fort Yukon, population 600, mostly Gwich'in Athabascans whose ancestors have lived in Alaska for over 10,000 years,  
​Fairfield
spent the first
​four
 years of her life in the small village along the banks of the Yukon River and then moved with her missionary parents to the big city of Fairbanks to attend
​elementary school and middle school
,
​graduating from
high school in 1992.




Her father was an Episcopalian missionary priest and a small plane pilot, first in Fort Yukon and then in Fairbanks, a university town where the University of Alaska-Fairbanks  is located. In Fort Yukon, her parents lived in the Episcopalian mission church
​log ​
house and offered what services the church could, baptisms, weddings, burials and more. They were one of the few white families in the village and the children cherished their time there.

Think things like Fairbanks at 60 degrees below for three weeks in the winter of 1989! Think life in a subsistence village of rural Alaskans whose ancestors go back centuries! Think boat trips on the Yukon in the summer, fishing for salmon, and yes, eating salmon!
​Lox!​


Hannah's parents went to Fort Yukon in the 1970s  to minister to the indigenous Indians there and attend to their religious and community needs.

Hannah left Alaska when she was 18 to attend college at
​tend Hobart and William Smith Colleges and ​
graduated in1996. Then it was on to Columbia University for two separate master's degrees before landing her first job at the New York Times as a graphic designer, a position she held for 17 years until she was selected inhouse for the Climate Desk gig.

Although there was a nationwide search via a public online advertisement for a new editor of the revamped Climate Desk, with applications coming in from over 1500 candidates, the choice was always going to be an inhouse selection. And it was. Hannah interviewed for the job and she got it.


So what does Alaska mean to this very well-placed climate journalist, Hannah Fairfield? And how has her experience growing up in a Christian missionary family in rural Alaska shaped her views  on nature, God and global warming?

Although a happy and dedicated New Yorker now, and loving it, they say back in Alaska that once you live there you can never really let the place go in your heart and mind and soul -- and in your view of the way the world works. Ask any Alaskan, past or present. It's that kind of place. The Last Frontier.

I know this feeling because I lived in Alaska for 12 years in the 1970s and 1980s -- mostly in Juneau but with two long winters in Nome -- and although I left the state in 1991, I still keep Alaska close in mind and worldview and my experiences there in fact led me to find a home later on
​in ​
the global community of writers, activists
​ and academics studying the issues of man-made global warming. Alaska gave birth to ''cli-fi.''



So with Hannah's  deep rural Alaska
​roots
, I am looking forward to
​her
long and successful 10-year reign 
​as ​
chief climate
​maven
for the New York Times.

Another thing I am looking forward to is the Climate Desk's
​possible ​
new policy of capitalizing the word "Earth" in
​news ​
stories about climate change and global warming, since there is no reason on Earth to keep lowercasing it
​as​
the newspaper
​ of record​
does now. Things change
​at the
Times, with time, and while the newspaper once capitalized the word Internet, it now lowercases it, following the Associated Press's lead. So I am looking forward to the Climate Desk under Hannah Fairfield's direction to start capitalizing the word Earth. For time being, the paper still writes "earth" in lowercase letters even in stories about ac
​t​
ivists working to protect the Earth from runaway global warming, and about indigenous peoples worldwide living with the consequences of climate change in the Arctic, in the Amazon and in Africa and Asia -- Australia, too.

It's not "earth Day" in April every year. It's "Earth Day, with a capital E. It's time for the New York Times to adjust their editorial style and start showing more respect for the Earth, our home planet.

Robert Pirsig: ''Zen" author dies, 88 h...... FACTCHECK PLEASE! he did not submit the book to 121 publishers before finding one. That is fake news BS! He made that up as a joke!


Robert Pirsig: ''Zen" author dies, 88


 https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/apr/25/robert-pirsig-zen-and-the-art-of-motorcycle-maintenance-author-dies-aged-88?CMP=share_btn_tw 


FACTCHECK PLEASE! he did not submit the book to 121 publishers.  fake BS!






FACTCHECK PLEASE! he did not submit the book to 121 publishers before finding one.  That is fake news BS! He made that up as a joke! Don't any journalists fact check their obits these days?
Almost every obit today says he submitted the book to OVER 100 publishers before finding one to publish it. Or 121 publishers. IT IS A LIE. an urban legend. a literary legend


FACT CHECK! Even Hillel Italie of AP reporteed this BS "fact".

Monday, April 24, 2017

When the New York Times climate desk speaks, the world listens: Meet Hannah Fairfield, editor with a mission




Meet Hannah Fairfield, the new editor of the New York Times revamped Climate Desk. She started in her new position this year after a nationwide search for a chief editor of the section and she's on a roll now,backed by a strong team of veteran reporters and with bunch of new hires coming aboard in June, too, including Brad Plumer coming over from Vox, where they do capitalize the word "Earth."


Born and raised in a rural Alaskan village, Fort Yukon, population 600, mostly Gwich'in Athabascans whose ancestors have lived in Alaska for over 10,000 years,  Hannah spent the first 4 years of her life in the small village along the banks of the Yukon River and then moved with her missionary parents to the big city of Fairbanks to attend grades 1 to  12, finishing high school in 1992.


http://www.nytco.com/hannah-fairfield-to-lead-climate-coverage/


Her father was an Episcopalian missionary priest, first in Fort Yukon and then in Fairbanks, a university town where the University of Alaska-Fairbanks (UAF)  is located. In Fort Fukon, her parents lived in the Episcopalian mission church house and offered what services the church could, baptisms, weddings, burials and more. They were one of the few white families in the village and the children cherished their time there.


Think things like Fairbanks at 60 degrees below for three weeks in the winter of 1989! Think life in a subsistence village of rural Alaskans whose ancestors go back centuries! Think boat trips on the Yukon in the summer, fishing for salmon, and yes, eating salmon!


Hannah's parents went to Fort Yukon in the 1970s  to minister to the indigenous Indians there and attend to their religious and community needs.


Hannah left Alaska when she was 18 to attend college at Hobart and William Smith Colleges and graduated in1996. Then it was on to Ciolumbia University for two separate master's deegrees before landing her first job at the New York Times as a graphic designer, a position she held for 17 years until she was selected inhouse for the Climate Desk gig.


Although there was a nationwide search via a public online advertisement for a new editor of the revamped Climate Desk, with applications coming in from over 1500 candidates, the choice was always going to be an inhouse selection. And it was. Hannah interviewed for the job and she got it.


So what does Alaska mean to this very well-placed climate journalist, Hannah Fairfield? And how has her experience growing up in a Christian missionary family in rural Alaska shaped her views  on nature, God and global warming?


Although a happy and dedicated New Yorker now, and loving it, they say back in Alaska that once you live there you can never really let the place go in your heart and mind and soul -- and in your view of the way the world works. Ask any Alaskan, past or present. It's that kind of place. The Last Frontier.


I know this feeling because I lived in Alaska for 12 years in the 1970s and 1980s -- mostly in Juneau but with two long winters in Nome -- and although I left the state in 1991 to live in Asia, I still keep Alaska close in mind and worldview and my experiences there in fact led me to find a home later on the global community of a artists, writers, dreamers and climate activists.


So with Hannah's  deep rural Alaska credentials, I am looking forward to a long and successful 10-year reign  at chief climate reporter for the New York Times.



PS -- Another thing I am looking forward to is the Climate Desk's new policy of capitalizing the word "Earth" in stories about climate change and global warming, since there is no reason on Earth to keep lowercasing it the newspaper does now. Things change the Times, with time, and while the newspaper once capitalized the word Internet, it now lowercases it, following the Associated Press's lead. So I am looking forward to the Climate Desk under Hannah Fairfield's direction lobbying the newspapers Style and Standards editors to start capitalizing the word Earth. For time being, the paper still writes "earth" in lowercase letters even in stories about acivists working to protect the Earth from runaway global warming, and about indigenous peoples worldwide living with the conseqences of climate change in the Arctic, in the Amazon and in Africa and Asia -- Australia, too.


It's not "earth Day" in April every year. It's "Earth Day, with a capital E. It's time for the New York Times to adjust their editorial style and start showing more respect for the Earth, our home planet.


This is how Dean Baquet punctuates the word EARTH in his memo to NYT staffers:


With Hannah’s appointment, we aim to build on what has already been dominant coverage of climate change and to establish The Times as a guide to readers on this most important issue. The subject has taken on more urgency as the earth’s temperature continues to break records and a new political leadership in Washington appears poised to make sweeping changes to policies meant to limit carbon emissions.
-- Dean, Joe and Matt”


Wouldn't it look better to readers, Dean, if you had written....?


....The subject has taken on more urgency as the Earth’s temperature continues to break records and a new political leadership in Washington appears poised to make sweeping changes to policies meant to limit carbon emissions.


NOTES:


After previously holding a senior graphics editor position, Hannah Fairfield will now serve as climate editor for The New York Times. In this role, she will overseeing climate change coverage, which crosses a variety of topical desks and global bureaus. Fairfield rejoined the NYT in 2012 as senior graphics editor after a stint as graphics editor for The Washington Post from 2010 to 2012. She served as graphics editor at The New York Times from 2000 through 2010. Follow The New York Times on Twitter.  



John Dos Passos' grandson keeps the author's literary flame alive

John Dos Passos' grandson keeps
the  author's literary flame alive



staff writer and agencies


http://www.johndospassos.com/



In recent years the life and times (and novels) of  the great American writer John Dos Passos have  gotten more media attention worldwide and now his grandson has set up a website to keep the flame alive. There are also literary conferences planned in Boston and Portugal for 2017 and 2018,  with more to come.


A panel on Dos Passos is scheduled in late May at a literary conference in Boston.
The John Dos Passos Society, the American academic society devoted to study of his work, is busy preparing for a conference in Boston in May 2017.


In the times we live in now, the popularity of the American writer has gone up, especially after the election of Donald Trump as president in the fall of 2016.


Here is just some of what's been happening in recent years.


Dos Passos has appeared in film, either as a character (in the HBO film "Hemingway and Gelhorn") or as the subject of Sonia Tercero Ramiro's documentary "Robles, Duel al Sol," which recounts the author's friendship with the scholar Jose Robles, the first Spanish translator of "Manhattan Transfer," who was executed under very mysterious circumstances during the Spanish Civil War.
This friendship is also recounted in the recent Spanish-language nonfiction book by Ignacio Martinez titled "Enterrar a Los Muertos" (To Bury the Dead), which has already come out in an English-language translation.


Finally, a book on the friendship between Ernest Hemingway and Dos Passos has recently been published by James McGrath Morris titled "The Ambulance Drivers."


In academia, the John Dos Passos Society, founded in 2011, has given scholars a means to channel their energies. The society held its first conference in 2014 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and its second in Madrid, Spain. The international enthusiasm for Dos Passos has prompted the society to hold its third conference in Lisbon, Portugal in 2018.


A number of events have converged to make Dos Passos seem more relevant than ever, including the 100th anniversary of the First World War, which Dos Passos witnessed first-hand as an ambulance driver near Verdun. Much of his early and mid-career fiction is haunted by this war.


Secondly, Dos Passos understood better than most writers of his age the pervasiveness of technology in the everyday lives, and even the cognitive processes, of humans.


Thirdly, our present political moment has proven Dos Passos to have been  unnervingly prescient. Dos Passos's observations, in both his fiction and non-fiction, track the rise of mass conformity on both the left and right.


Since the year 2000, America has seen swift and dramatic political shifts, from the neoconservatism of George W. Bush, to the election of the first African-American president, to the rise of nativist nationalism under Donald Trump.


One wonders if the country really knows what it wants any more than the characters who populate so much to Dos Passos fiction know. These shifts may also reflect that of the writer himself, who by the mid-1930s abandoned his leftist leanings for a more conservative vision, seeing the latter as the better alternative for preserving individual rights in a century increasingly overrun with the collusion of big government and big business.


 In addition, the author's grandson, John Dos Passos Coggin, who is a writer himself, has been working hard with his mother and other family members keeping Dos Passos's writings relevant with a dedicated literary  website.


See also:


https://blog.utc.edu/news/2016/08/professor-alumna-impact-international-literary-scene/


================


NOTES


The John Dos Passos Society was founded in 2011 by Aaron Shaheen, UC Foundation Associate Professor of English and Victoria Bryan, who received her BA and MA in English at UTC. 

Bryan’s initial interest in Dos Passos was sparked as a graduate student when she took a Modern American Novelist course taught by Shaheen.
“We read Dos Passos’s 42nd Parallel, and I couldn’t believe that I’d never heard this man’s name before, much less read any of his work.” Bryan
​said
, “Here was a writer tuned into the class and race struggles of the early 20th century, and though there are a few problems with how he represents women and minorities scattered throughout his work, he was leaps and bounds ahead of his contemporaries when it came to more complex and interesting understandings of characters who weren’t white males.”As Bryan went on to complete her PhD, her interest in Dos Passos persisted. In 2011 she organized a Dos Passos Panel at the American Literature Association Convention in Boston, MA. Shaheen presented as one of the speakers. It was at this conference that the two were inspired to create the John Dos Passos Society.
In October 2014, UTC hosted the first biennial conference, which featured the author’s grandson, John Dos Passos Coggin, as its keynote speaker.
Ever since Dos Passos’s novel Manhattan Transfer (1925) was translated into Spanish in 1927, the author has been widely read in Spain and other European countries. The international appreciation for his works has lasted to this day.
Ten different nations were represented at the conference, including Brazil, the United States, Portugal, Croatia, Denmark, Sweden, and Spain. The conference received widespread coverage in the Spanish print and digital media, including
​a
write-up in Spain’s leading daily newspaper, El Mundo.


The John Dos Passos Society, the American academic society devoted to study of his work, is busy preparing for a conference in Boston in May 2017.

Victoria Bryan is one of the co-founders of the John Dos Passos Society. She earned her PhD in English from the University of Mississippi and is an English faculty member at Cleveland State Community College in Cleveland, TN.
She says: "Since our founding in 2011, we’ve grown astronomically. We held our first international conference in 2016, and our membership has grown to almost 100 people. We’re represented at the American Literature Association on a regular basis, and we’re able to sponsor panels at various regional conferences.
She hopes the Boston conference this May will be an invigorating event marked by complex conversation about Dos Passos’s work and legacy.




She adds: "I always enjoy our teaching panels. They introduce so many avenues for bringing Dos Passos into the classroom, which may be one of the most powerful ways to bring an author’s work to a new generation. ''


At a previous conference in Chattanooga, she  presented a paper on Dos Passos’s involvement with prison writing and representations of prison during the 20s, 30s, and 40s.


"As I’ve continued researching the topic, I have things I’d certainly change about the paper, but the idea that Dos Passos struggled with how the U.S. prison system worked, particularly in relation to political prisoners, was a huge takeaway from my time in the Dos Passos archives at the University of Virginia in 2014. I was excited to be able to present on those findings, she says.


What was the last article or book by Dos Passos that she read and why?
''I’ve been re-reading the archival documents from UVA on prisons, particularly those that relate to Eugene Debs’ imprisonment, which Dos Passos seems to have been particularly troubled by. (In a somewhat related vein, I’ve been reading Eugene Debs’ Walls and Bars about his political beliefs, his prison time, and his run for Presidential office while incarcerated.) I’m hoping to develop my ideas about Dos Passos and prison writing further for more lengthy writing projects.''
"Dos Passos wrote very passionately about political freedom, and was adamantly opposed to the execution of Sacco and Vanzetti. His writing about these topics is powerful. I’ve often used his poem published in The New Masses “They Are Dead Now” in writing and lit classes in prison and in the free world to demonstrate that writing by and about incarcerated people deserves a place in our canon."
When asked what new books she'd recommend and why, she said:
I’m currently reading Margaret Atwood’s The Heart Goes Last. It’s about a devastating financial recession that leads to many losing their homes and livelihoods. The solution to this problem is to allow people to move into posh neighborhoods that have been abandoned, but they only get to live there half the year. The other half of the time they have to live in the local prison. It sounds so dystopian, but for many in our country and around the world, this isn’t so far from reality.​"








Saturday, April 22, 2017

Why doesn't the new editor of the NYT Climate Desk push to have her top brass allow her to start capitalizing the word "EARTH"? In this memo, even top EDITOR of NYT lowercases it as "earth." How can he be so wrong?

Why doesn't the new editor of the NYT Climate Desk push to have her top brass allow her to start capitalizing the word "EARTH"? In this memo, even top EDITOR of NYT lowercases it as "earth." How can he be so wrong?


RE:

Hannah Fairfield is now Leading Climate Coverage at the NYT which still sadly lowercases the word "earth" and will continue to do so until enough people raise their voices to Hannah, Dean, Matt and Joe  to get them to start capitalizing it.

See this example of how they lowercase the name of the planet we live on: -- The subject has taken on more urgency as the earth’s temperature continues to break records and a new political leadership in Washington appears poised to make sweeping changes to policies meant to limit carbon emissions.

It should be (get me write): The subject has taken on more urgency as the Earth’s temperature continues to break records and a new political leadership in Washington appears poised to make sweeping changes to policies meant to limit carbon emissions.
IMG_16083 copy.jpg

Alaskan native Hannah Fairfield, above, is now leading The Times’s climate coverage. Read more in this note from Dean Baquet, Joe Kahn and Matt Purdy where they lowercase the word "earth" when it SHOULD BE Capital E "Earth".....


“No topic is more vital than climate change and covering it requires drive, creativity and more than a little bit of specialized knowledge. We are thrilled to announce that we found an editor with all those qualities – and more – to lead our climate coverage: Hannah Fairfield.


Besides leadership skills that have impressed everyone in the Washington bureau and the graphics department, Hannah has tremendous visual storytelling power that is vital to telling the story of the havoc wreaked by climate change. ...... She grew up in Alaska, where the effects of rising temperatures are real and measurable, and she has two master’s degrees from Columbia, one in journalism and the other in environmental science, with a thesis in geochemistry.


Hannah has assembled and now leads a team of reporters and editors to cover the science of the globe’s changing climate and its political, economic, technological and social and CULTURAL and LITERARY consequences of cli-fi novels and movies.


The coverage will range from the work of scientists to the decisions of CEOs to the struggles of people living with rising seas and deepening drought.


Her team will draw together reporters covering climate change and its implication now working on a variety of desks. She will expand the group to enhance its explanatory, investigative and visual skills and to give our coverage a global reach and by including the rise of the new genre of cli-fi in literature and movies.


With Hannah’s appointment, we aim to build on what has already been dominant coverage of climate change and to establish The Times as a guide to readers on this most important issue.


The subject has taken on more urgency as the earth’s temperature continues to break records and a new political leadership in Washington appears poised to make sweeping changes to policies meant to limit carbon emissions.


signed
Dean, Joe and Matt”


That's Dean Baquet, Matt Purdy and Joe Kahn. Come on, guys, get with it! EARTH should be capitalized now. Wake up!


======


PS:


The Times’ approach involves a team of journalists dedicated to the climate and environment beat. Hannah Fairfield, who began her career as a graphics editor at the newspaper in 2000, started in February as the Times’ climate editor, a newly created position. Her experience also includes a two-year stint as graphics director at The Washington Post.


Fairfield’s team of reporters and editors includes John M. Broder, Coral Davenport, Henry Fountain, Justin Gillis, Nadja Popovich, John Schwartz, and Tatiana Schlossberg. Fairfield’s mission, she says, includes developing explanatory stories as well as stories with a visual component, such as video, photography and graphics.


At The Washington Post, a major Times competitor, climate change coverage is distributed across several desks and journalists, says Laura Helmuth, editor of the paper’s health, science, and environment team. Her writers include Darryl Fears and Brady Dennis, who cover climate change as part of their beat. Meteorologists Jason Samenow and Angela Fritz, along with financial reporters Chris Mooney and Steven Mufson also contribute. Suzanne Goldenberg, recently hired as an editor on the financial team, will work with Mooney and Mufson on an energy and environment blog. Rounding out the effort are several other political reporters who frequently cover climate policy and politics, including Juliet Eilperin, who focuses on the White House, and Lisa Rein, who deals with Congress.


In response to the Trump administration’s intense politicization of the issue, The Post now dedicates more resources to covering climate policy, says Helmuth. “We’re still greatly outnumbered by The New York Times’ dedicated climate staff,” she notes, “but that is the case for most departments.”
The Times’ Fairfield also notes a Trump factor, but in her case it involves the challenge of finding the right coverage balance between breaking climate policy news out of Washington, D.C., and stories about the global effects of climate change. “We have so much to cover in Washington right now, but there are really big stories about climate refugees and cities that are threatened and desperately trying to adapt to climate change,” she says.

For Earth Day 2017, the another cool website posts another ''cli-fi'' listicle on 14 of the best ''cli-fi'' novels of recent years, from Bacigalupi to Atwood to Ballard and more...

For Earth Day 2017, the another cool website posts another ''cli-fi'' listicle on 15 of the best ''cli-fi'' novels of recent years, from Bacigalupi to Atwood to Ballard and 11 more:





14 cli-fi books about climate change's worst case scenarios



Your 2017 ''Earth Day'' reading list


Today is Earth Day 2017, an occasion used to highlight environmental awareness and the state of our planet’s health. Climate change has become a major focus in recent decades, and while 120 nations across the world ratified the Paris Agreement at COP21 a year ago, significant challenges remain in the years and decades to come. Which is to say that to think about climate science is to think seriously and passionately about the future.



Of course one group that keeps a close eye on what the future might hold for civilization are climate change fiction authors. For decades, they have used the idea of a changing climate in their stories, extrapolating the latest scientific evidence into tale of how humanity is coping (or not) with rising sea levels and temperatures.


We’ve collected eight stories that explore climate science and what the future could hold for us.

The MaddAddam trilogy, Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood is getting a lot of attention post-Trump election for her 1985 dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale and its TV adaptation, but it would be a mistake to overlook her MaddAddam novels: Oryx and Crake, The Year of the Flood, and MaddAddam. In the critically acclaimed cli-fi trilogy, Atwood follows the survivors of a biological catastrophe in a post apocalyptic future. The novels tracks several characters as they witness the end of the world, with rising sea levels and environmental degradation a major factor. Over the three books, she addresses how her characters cope with existing in a radically changed world, and the steps they must take to rebuild civilization once again.

The Windup Girl and The Water Knife, Paolo Bacigalupi

Over the course of his career, Paolo Bacigalupi focused on environmental issues, especially in his novels. The Windup Girl is a particularly chilling take on what the future could hold. Set centuries in the future, the oceans have risen and fossil fuels depleted, all while plagues and mutated invasive species cause widespread famine across the world. The book follows several characters in a futuristic Thailand. They struggle to survive in a world defined by genetic engineering and cutthroat businessmen who will stop at nothing to make a profit. The Water Knife takes place closer to the present, but presents a future that’s no less dire. Climate change has ravaged the American southwest. The novel’s characters seek something even more valuable than gold: the rights to control the region’s water supply. In both novels, Bacigalupi points to economic inequality as a huge contributing factor for the changes that destroyed the climate.
clock menu more-arrow       

California, Edan Lepucki

Edan Lepucki’s debut cli-fi California was more of literary take on climate change than some of the other selections on this list, though it shares an interest in the lengths people will go to survive when civilization begins to collapse. Cal and Frida have escaped into the woods following the general destruction of society from a mix of economic and climate upheavals. They etch out a living by themselves. When Frida discovers that she’s pregnant, they seek out shelter with a nearby settlement, only to find that the closed-knit community is rife with paranoia and secrets. Lepucki’s novel looks back at some of the earliest tropes in American literature to show that the communities that people take refuge in can be just as dangerous as the world they offer protection against.


The Drowned World J.G. Ballard

J.G. Ballard’s 1962 cli-fi novel is considered one of the best examples of early climate change fiction. The polar ice caps have melted and submerged much of the Northern hemisphere. As a biologist in London sets off on a mapping expedition, Ballard uses the novel to explore the unconscious impulses of humanity’s survivors. As the world regresses, so to do its inhabitants. The morals that held society together disintegrate, and civilization unravels.

The Broken Earth trilogy, N.K. Jemisin

N.K. Jemisin’s books are some of the most original and eye-opening fantasies being published today, and these books have a particularly vibrant take on survival. Jemisin’s world goes through cycles of catastrophes that upend humanity each time. The stress of the continual shifts leads to an oppressed people known as orogenes — mutated, or maybe just magical — who can use their powers to alter the planet, for better or worse. Jemisin investigates the alienation of her characters, and explores how society reacts when constantly bombarded by trauma. 

New York 2140, Kim Stanley Robinson

We recently reviewed Kim Stanley Robinson’s new cli-fi novel, and New York 2140 is book that likely paints the most realistic climate change scenario. Set over 120 years in the future, the inhabitants of New York City’s MetLife Tower make their way through life amidst rising tides. While it’s an optimistic and even funny novel, he uses the book to lay out the connections between unfettered capitalism and a warming climate, and warns that unless society-changing fixes are made, we will live with the consequences.
         

Area X Trilogy, Jeff Vandermeer

If you’re looking for something a bit more horrifying (as if these futures aren’t terrifying enough) look no further than Jeff Vandermeer’s climate change fiction novels Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance. The Area X trilogy blends a changing world and climate with otherworldly and outright unexplainable horror. A large portion of the southern coast is abruptly cut off by a barrier, allowing the regions it contains to revert to pristine wilderness. Subsequent expeditions to the territory reveal a strange and hostile world that’s slightly wrong. Vandermeer uses the novels to analyze how we adapt to strange new surroundings.

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins

Like Bacigalupi’s cli-fi The Water Knife, Claire Vaye Watkins sets her cli-fi novel in an American southwest that’s been ravaged by drought. The region’s remaining inhabitants —Mojavs — are prevented from escaping to better homes by armed vigilantes and an uncaring government. A pair of survivors, Luz and Ray, get by in one of the governmental settlements, and when they discover an abandoned child, they are moved to escape their broken and violent home to find a better home.

Friday, April 21, 2017

5 Cli-Fi Books Everyone’s Reading: Nirvaan Sarkar makes a list with some great commentary as well!

5 Cli-Fi Books Everyone’s Reading

Get onto the latest reading trend – climate fiction